Groundswell Tag

Published on Huffington Post. One year ago this morning, a lone gunman walked into a house of worship and stalked the prayer hall, communal kitchen and living rooms. Wherever he saw people, he lifted his gun without expression and fired. He killed six people and critically wounded others, including a police officer. The August 5, 2012 mass shooting in Oak Creek, Wisconsin received national attention for a few days, but then faded into the background as one in a list of mass shootings last year. One year later, people

By Kim Lawton Published on Washington Post. “The legacy of Oak Creek is not one of bloodshed,” said Valarie Kaur, founding director of the interfaith group Groundswell, a project of Auburn Seminary in N.Y. “(It’s of) how a community rose to bring people together to heal and to organize for lasting social change,” she told the PBS television program “Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.” Sikhs first came to the U.S. 100 years ago, and they now number about half a million people. Many say they continue to face discrimination and misunderstanding. Sikh men

Here is my interview reflecting on the one-year anniversary of the Oak Creek tragedy on PBS's Religion and Ethics Newsweekly. In the last year, I've witnessed the Sikh spirit of Chardi Kala, everlasting hope and optimism, even in suffering. This is the untold story of tragedy. Want to honor Oak Creek? Watch the Film. Join the Movement: http://www.groundswell-movement.org/the-one-year-anniversary-of-oak-creek  

Watch this outstanding PBS news report about the Sikh community's response to the mass shooting in Oak Creek, WI one year later. I had an opportunity to present my perspective on advocating for the Sikh community. Watch the full interview to learn more about the Sikh spirit of chardhi kala, everlasting optimism and ever-rising high spirits, even in the face of tragedy.  

I was honored to receive a 2013 Person of the Year award from India Abroad. But I must share this award with a rising generation of Sikh and South Asian Americans devoted to justice work -- the stellar staff at the Sikh Coalition, Groundswell, SALDEF, SAALT, and many more. I am proud to be part of a new generation of Americans rising to join a larger movement for human dignity and civil rights. Here is my acceptance speech, a reflection and call to action for the future

Published by Stanford News. President Hennessy, Dean McLennan, professors and staff, family and friends, and the Class of 2013, it is a profound gift for me to return to Stanford to address you. Ten years ago, when I stood in this spot to deliver the student address, I believed what they always tell us on graduation day – that your Stanford education empowers to change the world, that we are the ones we have been waiting for. But what they don't tell us in college is just how dangerous

Breaking news! On Wednesday afternoon, an FBI advisory policy board voted to track hate crimes against Sikh, Hindu, and Arab Americans. We did this together! On August 5th, 2012, six Sikh Americans were murdered in a gurdwara (Sikh house of worship) in one of the greatest hate-based mass shootings in recent U.S. history. Within 48 hours, thousands of Groundswell members sent prayers and messages of solidarity from all over the country. I delivered them in Wisconsin the first Sunday after the mass shooting. And in the following months, you signed and shared the petition telling

Here's my take on Angelina Jolie's story to pursue preventive care for breast cancer. On MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry Show, I talk about how women's health movements can use stories like Jolie's to break down economic and cultural barriers to care facing lower-income women and women of color, not just for breast cancer but for other less visible diseases such as myeloma and endometriosis. "Angelina Jolie's Story and the Politics of Breast Cancer" - Valarie Kaur on MSNBC's "Melissa Harris-Parry Show" May 19, 2013 from Sharat Raju on Vimeo.

Published on the Melissa Harris-Perry Blog, MSNBC Angelina Jolie’s medical condition is rare and few women could benefit from the genetic testing she received, but her New York Times op-ed has ignited a national conversation about barriers to care for breast cancer. In America today, white women are most likely to receive a breast cancer diagnosis, Asian women are least likely to screen for it, and black women are most likely to die from it. This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to women’s health in America. Millions more women suffer

The Class of 2013 is facing staggering student debt, a tough job market, and the reality of Washington gridlock - and yet we remain optimistic about the future? Why? I presented a portrait of the Millennial generation on MSNBC's Melissa-Harry Perry Show on graduation weekend:   "The Class of 2013" - Valarie Kaur on MSNBC's "Melissa Harris-Parry Show" May 19, 2013 from Sharat Raju on Vimeo.