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This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post. Today, after more than a year of national debate, the Open Internet Order goes into effect. The Order keeps the Internet an open and democratic space free from undue corporate control. Business leaders, start-up innovators, and economists widely praise the Order as win for the economic growth. But protecting the open Internet is not just sound policy -- it's a moral imperative. Today, I join twelve of America's top faith and moral leaders - Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh, and Humanist - to celebrate

This piece original appeared in On Faith. Today, the Open Internet Order becomes effective. Adopted after a year of national debate, the order codifies “net neutrality” — the principle that keeps the Internet an open and democratic space. Specifically, it bans carriers like Comcast and Verizon from blocking and slowing down websites at will, or charging sites extra fees to reach people faster. Why are Americans of all faiths and beliefs celebrating? If carriers created “fast lanes” online, most faith and non-profit groups could not afford to be in them.

As the Open Internet Order goes into effect today, I wanted to make sure that you saw what faith leaders are saying about the importance a free and open web: You can read the original article on the Huffington Post. By Carol Kuruvilla The Open Internet Order has gone into effect -- protecting what faith leaders are calling the “fundamental right” of Internet freedom. Along with demanding more transparency from broadband companies, the Federal Communications Commission’s order prevents providers from blocking, slowing down, or allowing paid prioritization of websites. As part of a campaign

Friends ask me why I've taken on Internet freedom as part of my advocacy work. Click below to hear my 12-minute interview on "State of Belief" radio with Rev. Welton Gaddy explaining why: You can also read the transcript: Interfaith Alliance State of Belief Radio March 14, 2015 TRANSCRIPT: REV. DR. C. WELTON GADDY, HOST: This past week, I noticed a strident column in the conservativeWashington Timesdecrying the Federal Communication Commission’s new rules on Net Neutrality asan existential threat to religious freedom. Huh? Joining me now to shed some light on this issue is

I am thankful that the International Business Times included me in their article on the ways in which different faiths celebrate Thanksgiving. You can read the article and my quote in it here. Also, here is the rest of the text from my interview: "Many Sikhs choose to commemorate the holiday through the core Sikh practice of seva, or 'spiritually grounded service.' The Sikh commitment to seva inspires the tradition of 'langar' -- a free communal meal served to anyone who walks into a Sikh gurdwara (house of worship) in America and

I was excited to see this and other wonderful coverage on the birthday of Guru Nanak, founder of the Sikh faith: http://www.ibtimes.com/guru-nanaks-birthday-2014-3-things-you-need-know-about-sikh-holiday-1720042. I was also so glad to be quoted in the International Business Times' article: “For many, [today] is a profound time to reflect on Guru Nanak's vision of Oneness -- the oneness of the divine and the oneness of humanity -- and his message: ‘I see no stranger,’” Valarie Kaur, an interfaith organizer who is Sikh, said. “If we begin to see the world in this way, it inspires an

Check out the new PBS documentary Makers: Women in Business. I make a brief appearance on the question of “leaning in” at minute 43:33-44:55. Though only for a few seconds, I am glad the film documents some of the complexities of the debate surrounding women's leadership and Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In. You can read my full critique published in an essay for MSNBC “Lean in? For Millennials, the question is what are we leaning toward.” Or watch my appearance on the Melissa Harris-Perry show here.

During the "Weekend of Resistance" in Ferguson, Missouri, I appeared on "The Melissa Harris-Perry Show" to discuss  why the Weekend and #FergusonOctober calls upon us to confront not just police accountability but race in America. You can watch our panel's segment here: http://www.msnbc.com/melissa-harris-perry/watch/anti-police-violence-movement-draws-youth-340967491740

Published by The Legacy Project. Valarie Kaur is a national interfaith leader, documentary filmmaker, and lawyer who centers her work around the power of storytelling. She is the founder of Groundswell at Auburn Seminary, a non-profit initiative with 100,000 members that equips people of faith in social movements. Working with students and communities, she has made award-winning films and led campaigns on hate crimes, gun violence, racial profiling, immigration detention, and solitary confinement. Valarie is a prolific public speaker on college and university campuses and frequent political contributor on MSNBC to the Melissa Harris-Perry Show. Her opinion

Published by Huffington Post. The following remarks were delivered at the Pentagon's first-ever event to commemorate the Sikh faith on April 25, 2014. Hosted by the Pentagon Chaplain, the program was organized by Major Kalsi, Captain Rattan, Corporal Lamba, and the Sikh Coalition, an organization leading the campaign for turbaned Sikhs and other people of faith to be allowed to serve in the U.S. military. Waheguru Ji Ka Kalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh. Thank you to the Pentagon Chaplain and Chaplain corps for gathering us here to celebrate Vaisakhi, the