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I've been speaking about a rising generation ready to emerge from the shadows of the last decade and enter a new era of social change. Now we are seeing something emerge -- a grassroots campaign has caught fire, turning out thousands of people, young and old, to create a free democratic space called Liberty Square on Wall Street. All kinds of people are protesting that Wall Street has been rescued but there has been no help for most Americans. And city after city is joining them. Their statement: “We are

On Sunday night, when I got off the train near Ground Zero to attend a 9/11 multifaith ceremony, I walked right into an anti-Muslim protest. Two hundred people cheered on speakers who warned of sharia law and the Muslim invasion.  Their signs read: "Mohammad was a terrorist." A moment later, their eyes were on us -- we looked like their enemies -- and my throat caught.  I cried, and walked away. But when I finally got to the ceremony, I saw why we did this together.  Four times as many

The story was originally printed on Newsday here. We have been collecting Ribbons of Hope from across the country and around the world to mark the 10-year anniversary of 9/11. Our partners at Prepare New York are weaving these ribbons into a colorful tapestry that to me, represents a groundswell of people ready to overcome fear and divisiveness on this anniversary.  Send your Ribbon of Hope to Ground Zero today (easy and free).  Newsday just covered our efforts: The fluttering ribbons came from near and far, their messages and prayers

On Tuesday night, hundreds of people gathered together at Groundswell's kick-off teach-in in NYC and imagined how a movement based on compassion and community could emerge from the shadows this tenth anniversary of 9/11. I can still feel the electricity in the room -- and the excitement about what we could build. We envisioned a movement that's not about a single issue, political party or particular tradition -- but a shared moral vision of a world where each of us feels at home. Check out video clips of social innovator

“We need to have an ‘American spring’… nonviolent change where people from the grassroots get involved again.”  – Former Vice President Al Gore, August 2011 We’re hungry for a movement. Faith and moral communities around the globe are tired of politics that maintain the status quo. Here in the U.S., a rising generation is finding brave new ways to channel moral vision into action: we’re marching in the streets for immigration reform, holding the banner of marriage equality, pushing back on anti-Muslim rhetoric, and demanding an end to

As many of you know, for the last decade, I've had the opportunity to tour with Divided We Fall, leading dialogues on campuses and communities in 200 cities across the country. And I began to notice something -- a rising generation of people like me were tired of partisan politics and hungry for meaningful social action. Many of us found it in the campaign of President Obama. And while I'm proud to have worked on his campaign, it's clear now that we need more than a president

I spent much of my twenties living out of my suitcase, touring with Divided We Fall, crisscrossing the country listening to peoples' stories about their experience in the ongoing aftermath of 9/11.  I blogged about many of them, but there were too many for one person to capture.  I wished that one site where people could submit their own untold stories -- a kind of open-source epilogue to the film.  Today, it exists. A coalition of community organizations joined forces to create the Unheard Voices of 9/11 Project. 

Osama bin Laden's face is all over the television.  People are flooding the streets waving American flags.  The President speaks of our unity and resolve as a nation.  And 9/11 is on everyone's mind.  This has all happened before. Except this time, ten years after 9/11, we are not grieving death; we are celebrating death.  We have slain Osama bin Laden - the one who first slayed us.  And we are singing and laughing and high-fiving.  As if this is the end.  As if violence can end a

Last week, NPR reported a growing trend among local NAACP chapters. They're electing a new generation of leaders, many of whom are not African-American.  In Waterbury, Connecticut, the chapter elected Victor Diaz, a 32-year-old Hispanic who is one of about a dozen new local leaders broadening the NAACP mission.  They are changing the face of the NAACP as an organization not just for African-Americans but also for immigrants and LGBT people. This news was music to my ears.  For too long, civil rights organizations have fought campaigns as