Millennials Tag

By Valarie Kaur and Sharat Raju Published on Huffington Post. Six months ago today, a small Midwestern town was rocked by a mass shooting at a house of worship. The massacre in Oak Creek, Wisconsin that claimed the lives of six people on August 5, 2012 is only one in a tragically long list of recent mass shootings. Yet in this political moment - when sustained public pressure could lead to real gun control reform - the Oak Creek tragedy and response offers a vital lesson: the efficacy of resilience. We

Millennials showed up at the polls this week! We weren't out in the same numbers as 2008, but we were a sizable force that made a difference. Sixty percent of us voted for President Obama this election. On MSNBC, I offer a portrait of the Millennial generation on the eve of the election and lift up a hope that was delivered: Valarie Kaur on MSNBC "Melissa Harris-Perry Show" Oct. 27 2012: Milliennials and the Election

This morning, watching dawn break over New Haven, I see the faces of the young people I've met these many weeks during election season. In Philadelphia, college students struggling to walk the path of social justice in tough economic times, In Los Angeles, interfaith students figuring out how to answer their calling. In Washington, DC, Sikh Americans aching to serve their community in response to a rising tide of hate. And in my neighborhood in New Haven, young people of color coping with the sound of gunshots in

Letter from dear friend and mentor Amardeep Bhalla to fellow Sikh Americans on Election Day: Dear Sikh Friends, In case there is any Sikh American voter left to be persuaded, I just wanted to share this quick but comprehensive list of what the Obama Administration has done for our community. From reading it, I believe it will become clear that President Obama is by far the candidate most likely to advance Sikh American issues. I urge any Sikh, whether they are Democrat, Republican, or Independent, to please read it. Regardless

On Friday, I spent the day with Millennials at the University of Pennsylvania. One of them did a thorough write-up of the event for the school paper. Thank you Harry for your good work! And thank you to all the UPenn students for an energizing and inspiring discussion on the eve of the 2012 Election! Award-Winning Filmmaker Explains Storytelling as Advocacy By Harry Cooperman, published on The Daily Pennsylvanian Storytelling plus advocacy equals social change. According to Valarie Kaur, this is an equation that will reshape the world. On Friday, Kaur,

Published on CNN. As a politically active Millennial invested in this year's election, I was surprised by my own response to the first presidential debate: I was bored. But not for all the reasons the pundits are talking about. To be sure, President Barack Obama's lackluster performance and Mitt Romney's free rein over the moderator led us into the weeds of policy without a compass. But that wasn't the only reason the candidates didn't speak to me. The debate was supposed to be about domestic issues, but focused exclusively on

Published on The Melissa Harris-Perry Blog. Just 45 days after his mother was murdered by a white supremacist in her house of worship, Harpreet Singh Saini found the courage to testify at a historic Senate hearing on Wednesday of this week. Saini’s mother was killed on August 5 when Wade Michael Page walked into a Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, and opened fire. “I want to protect other people from what happened to my mother,” Saini told the Senate Judiciary subcommittee, chaired by Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois.

Published on The Washington Post. In the thick of election season, the mass shooting of Sikh worshippers in Oak Creek, Wis., on Aug. 5, 2012, has quickly faded from public consciousness. But a month later, the tragedy is front and center in the minds of Sikh Americans. In their gurdwaras (houses of worship) and homes, Sikh Americans are still making sense of this tragedy and asking themselves: “What do we do next?” For Sikh Americans, Oak Creek has become both a cause for introspection and an urgent call to

Published on CNN. The Republican National Convention will make history Wednesday night. Ishwar Singh, wearing a turban and beard, will take the stage and lead thousands of conservatives in prayer. For the first time in U.S. history, a Sikh American will give the invocation at a Republican National Convention. The inclusion of a Sikh prayer on the stage comes just a few weeks after a gunman opened fire on Sikhs praying in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, killing six and hospitalizing three more in what could be the largest racially motivated mass

Published on CNN. I have spent the past two weeks documenting the aftermath of what could be one of the deadliest racially motivated mass shootings in recent U.S. history. Through a camera lens, I’ve witnessed courage in the face of profound grief: families in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, mourning the dead, praying through tears and rebuilding their community in the Sikh spirit of chardi kala, a rising resilience even in darkness. But when family members walked out of a private meeting with first lady Michelle Obama on Thursday afternoon,