hate Tag

By Anju Kaur Published by SikhNN. A new kind of activism was born out of the Balbir Singh Sodhi tragedy ten years ago when he became the first person killed in the backlash against those perceived to be related to the 9/11 attackers. About 100 people gathered at his Mesa, Arizona, gas station to remember Balbir Singh who was gunned down on Sept. 15, 2011. He was shot because of his Sikh identity of unshorn hair and turban. His attacker, Frank Roque, went on a rampage, shooting him five times

I'm writing tonight from Mesa, Arizona, where a family friend was murdered ten years ago.  His name was Balbir Singh Sodhi.He was a turbaned Sikh man who owned his own gas station and was well-loved for his generosity and broad smile.On Sept. 15, 2001, he visited Costco to buy flowers and emptied his pocket to make a donation to the 9/11 relief efforts in the check out line.  A few hours later, he was shot and killed in front of his store by a man who called

“We need to have an ‘American spring’… nonviolent change where people from the grassroots get involved again.”  – Former Vice President Al Gore, August 2011 We’re hungry for a movement. Faith and moral communities around the globe are tired of politics that maintain the status quo. Here in the U.S., a rising generation is finding brave new ways to channel moral vision into action: we’re marching in the streets for immigration reform, holding the banner of marriage equality, pushing back on anti-Muslim rhetoric, and demanding an end to

Oslo is everywhere. As we see bodies recovered and hear stories of young people who survived the massacre, our hearts ache.  But in the last few days, we've learned that we are closer to the tragedy than we can imagine. The killer is not a "Muslim terrorist," as many conservatives in this country were quick to conclude.  Anders Breivik is a right-wing Christian directly influenced by a small group of anti-Muslim American bloggers and activists who claim that Muslim immigrants threaten western civilization. Robert Spencer, who runs Jihad Watch

I've just received an invitation from President Obama to the White House on Wednesday for a briefing and reception in honor of Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage.  The shock is not wearing off. I've asked Sharat to come with me, and both of us are brainstorming about how to make this visit useful.  There's so much on our minds --preparing for the 9/11 anniversary, supporting multifaith movement building, mobilizing Millennials, standing up for Sikh and Muslim Americans, pushing for immigration reform and LGBT equality and closing Guantanamo

Osama bin Laden's face is all over the television.  People are flooding the streets waving American flags.  The President speaks of our unity and resolve as a nation.  And 9/11 is on everyone's mind.  This has all happened before. Except this time, ten years after 9/11, we are not grieving death; we are celebrating death.  We have slain Osama bin Laden - the one who first slayed us.  And we are singing and laughing and high-fiving.  As if this is the end.  As if violence can end a

Anyone who knows about the aftermath of 9/11 will remember the story of Balbir Singh Sodhi.  A turbaned Sikh man, he was the first person murdered in a hate crime in response to 9/11.  It called national attention to anti-Muslim violence and galvanized action from all corners.  In Arizona, where three thousand people attended the memorial, the legislature honored Sodhi on the state’s 9/11 Memorial. His story has never been disputed.  Until now. This month, Arizona Representative John Kavanagh introduced a bill that would remove Sodhi’s name from the

As I write this, my eyes are swollen from crying.  It's not that I'm not accustomed to the news.  Taxi drivers shot.  Kids bullied.  Gurdwaras set on fire.  And the routine "hey Osama" on the street.  For ten years, I've documented hate against Sikh Americans, as well as Muslim, Arab, and other South Asian Americans.  I was twenty when I began this work a few days after 9/11.  Now I'm thirty.  I didn't know I would be doing it for ten years. But that's not why I broke

Watch this video. Fear and hate for Muslim Americans on full display at a protest against a charity fundraiser in Yorba Linda, California. Children walk past as protesters scream "TERRORIST" and "REMEMBER 9/11." I have a lump in my throat, but now is the time to speak, even if our voice trembles. The ten-year anniversary of 9/11 this year will invite more of this into the public square and our national discourse. Will we be ready to respond with smart, compassionate and courageous action? If you want to