Press

By Anju Kaur Published by SikhNN. A new kind of activism was born out of the Balbir Singh Sodhi tragedy ten years ago when he became the first person killed in the backlash against those perceived to be related to the 9/11 attackers. About 100 people gathered at his Mesa, Arizona, gas station to remember Balbir Singh who was gunned down on Sept. 15, 2011. He was shot because of his Sikh identity of unshorn hair and turban. His attacker, Frank Roque, went on a rampage, shooting him five times

The story was originally printed on Newsday here. We have been collecting Ribbons of Hope from across the country and around the world to mark the 10-year anniversary of 9/11. Our partners at Prepare New York are weaving these ribbons into a colorful tapestry that to me, represents a groundswell of people ready to overcome fear and divisiveness on this anniversary.  Send your Ribbon of Hope to Ground Zero today (easy and free).  Newsday just covered our efforts: The fluttering ribbons came from near and far, their messages and prayers

The Associated Press just covered our clinic's case against racial profiling in East Haven, CT.  Here's the story as published in the Washington Post: Citing police abuse, Hispanics leaving Conn. town -- By MICHAEL MELIA The Associated Press Sunday, December 26, 2010; 3:22 PM EAST HAVEN, Conn. -- Santiago Malave has worked law enforcement jobs in Connecticut for more than four decades, but as a Puerto Rican, he says he cannot drive through his own town without worrying about police harassing him. Malave, a probation officer who works in New Haven, says the racial

We are filing a major lawsuit tomorrow on behalf of clients who have endured racial profiling and police brutality in East Haven, CT.  Our clients' story just made the New York Times: Latino Immigrants to Sue a Connecticut Police Dept., Asserting Racial Bias By SAM DOLNICK When Yadanny García asked police officers in East Haven, Conn., why they were ordering him to the ground, they shocked him three times with a Taser gun, punched him and told him to “go back to your country.” When José Luis Albaraccín was arrested after

We're very pleased to land on the front page of today's New Haven Register.  The reporter Mary O'Leary captured the spirit of our campaign.  Worth the full read: Students' New Campaign Fights Islamophobia Mary O'Leary - September 13, 2010 NEW HAVEN — Valarie Kaur is an award-winning filmmaker who has fought racism for the past nine years, and still she found herself overwhelmed and paralyzed by the anti-Muslim sentiment flowing from controversy over the planned Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York. A student at the Yale Law School, Kaur said the

We did it.  In ten days, working with an amazing core of volunteers, we conceived, developed, and launched a full-fledged campaign!  In the first 24 hours, we have hit 36 states, hundreds of co-signers and several news outlets.  And we have only just begun. Sign the Charter.  Host a Dialogue.  Spread the Word. On the 9/11 anniversary tomorrow, as some groups threaten to burn the Qur'an, I invite you to raise your voice and stand for your own vision of America through Common Ground. Share on facebook, blast

By Everett Rosenfeld Published by Yale Daily News. When Valarie Kaur LAW ’11 first heard about Ahmed Sharif, the New York City cab driver who was attacked Aug. 24 by a drunken passenger for being Muslim, she did not know how to respond. “We are witnessing a wave of hate crimes across the country, not fully being covered on the news,” she said. “This [situation] is becoming insidious, life-threatening, and serious, but I found myself in a paralysis.” Within a week, Matthew Matera LAW ’11 came to her room to talk about

Today, the New York Times covered our case against racial profiling in East Haven, CT. My team and I have been working on this case for more than a year as part of the Worker and Immigrant Rights Clinic at Yale Law School: CONNECTICUT TOWN GRAPPLES WITH CLAIMS OF POLICE BIAS Nina Bernstein Since 2008, officials in East Haven, Conn., a working-class suburb with a long history of toxic relations between the police and minorities, have played down Latinos’ complaints of accelerating police harassment and brutality. Local officials appeared unperturbed when

"How quiet can 1,000 people be?  When Valarie Kaur spoke at a noontime gathering November 10, the Minneapolis Convention Center was so silent that the only sound was that of the muted traffic from nearby 12th Street.  Kaur, the keynote speaker at It's Time To Talk: Forums on Race, held the audience spellbound as she asked us to remember and experience again the feeling of being an outsider.  The seventh annual gathering was invigorating and inspiring." - Becky Roloff, CEO of the Young Women's Christian Association of Minnesota Check out

To commemorate the four-year anniversary of the murder of Balbir Sodhi, Arizona's East Valley Tribune ran a front page article about his story and our film Divided We Fall. Sikhs Still Living in the Shadow of Sept. 11. Nick Martin On a Saturday in 2001, less than two weeks after the S ept. 11 terrorist attacks, thousands gathered at Phoenix Civic Plaza to honor a man most had never met. (Gaurav Singh, a relative of Balbir Singh Sodhi, kneels by a memorial outside the Mesa Star Convenience store where Sodhi was