Press

Published by Huffington Post. HuffPost Religion celebrates the Sikh American community and all of its diverse accomplishments. These eight people have made headlines for a wide variety of achievements, from athletic prowess to human rights leadership. Meet the future of America's Sikh community here: Prabhjot Singh Prabhjot Singh, a professor at Columbia University, sustained serious injuries after being subjected to a brutal hate crime attack. In a blog about the incident, his friend Simran Jeet Singh said that "Prabhjot has dedicated his life to serving the underserved," as Director of Systems Management at the

By Annabelle Estera, Asian Pacific American Network, Ohio State University One of the best parts of my job is the ability to bring in engaging, thought-provoking, and inspiring speakers. On November 14th, The Ohio State University welcomed filmmaker, civil rights advocate, and interfaith leader, Valarie Kaur to campus. There was a full day of activities planned, including a lunch, workshop, and dinner with staff and students, culminating with an evening screening of her 2006 documentary “Divided We Fall: Americans in the Aftermath,” which tells the story of her travels around the country documenting

Here it is -- the "Top 50 Coolest Desis" of 2013! Congrats to the dizzying array of artists, entrepreneurs and activists who made the list. Surprised and grateful to make the top 10 with brother Prabhjot Singh! When else do we get to be in the company of stars like Neena Davaluri, Mindy Kaling, Aasif Mandvi, Aziz Ansari, and Russell Peters? Check out the top 10 picks below, or follow the link to see the full list: http://www.desiclub.com/community/culture/culture_article.cfm?id=1210 Excited to see so many trailblazers who inspire me, including Saru Jayaraman

It was such an honor to be featured on "Portraits of Sikhs" Facebook page! They wrote: Meet Sikh Leader, Valarie Kaur. Valarie Kaur is an award-winning filmmaker, civil rights advocate, and interfaith organizer. A third-generation Sikh American, she is the founding director of Groundswell, a non-profit initiative at Auburn Seminary that mobilized faith communities in bold collective action. In response to the tragedy in Oak Creek, WI, Groundswell organized thousands to send letters of support to Sikh families, call upon the FBI to track anti-Sikh hate crimes, and lead college

Published on the blog for the Middle East Studies Center at Ohio State University. We had the honor of co-hosting Valarie Kaur with the Multicultural Center, OSU Hillel, Mundo, OSU First Year Experience, the Office of Student Life, Asian American Association, Better Together, Indian Student Association, and the South Asian Student Association. Twelve years ago,  in the wake of September 11, 2001, Kaur set off across the country to discover the stories of those affected by this post-9/11 anger and hatred toward what Mahmoud has called "Muslim-looking others".  Since September 11th Sikhs, who often wear

I'm deeply honored to be included in Audrey Magazine's list of influential Asian American women, especially alongside two of my heroes, Grace Lee Boggs and Somaly Mam. These women have inspired me for years to follow in their footsteps as strong women of color. Check out the video below to learn more or go here to read full profiles for all eight women. Profile: Valarie Kaur By Audrey Magazine On September 11, 2001, Valarie Kaur watched in horror, along with her fellow Americans, as the two towers fell. A third generation

Here's my interview with State of Belief discussing the one-year anniversary of Oak Creek. In the past twelve months, we have seen the Sikh community rebuild and unite in optimism and love to combat hate violence and domestic terrorism. Watch the video to learn more. Part I: Part II:

By Jessica Testa Published on BuzzFeed. Wade Michael Page didn’t speak to his victims before killing them. One year ago Monday, he “just began shooting.” On Aug. 5, 2012, Page walked into the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin with a 9-millimeter semiautomatic handgun. The 40-year-old Army veteran and skinhead musician killed six worshippers and wounded three others before an Oak Creek police officer shot him down. It was an act of hate — “domestic terrorism” — carried out on a group of people gathered to pray. As filmmaker and civil-rights advocate Valarie Kaur told BuzzFeed

By Sean Lewis Published on WGN Chicago. In the rain, the community of Oak Creek Wisconsin came together, remembering the tragedy here one year ago. To this day, no one knows why gunman, white supremacist and army veteran wade Michael Page walked into the Sikh Temple on a Sunday morning and began to shoot.  He killed six people and injured many others before he shot and killed himself. “This is not just a Sikh tragedy, this is an American tragedy,” Filmmaker Valarie Kaur has spent the last year talking with the victims

By Kim Lawton Published on Washington Post. “The legacy of Oak Creek is not one of bloodshed,” said Valarie Kaur, founding director of the interfaith group Groundswell, a project of Auburn Seminary in N.Y. “(It’s of) how a community rose to bring people together to heal and to organize for lasting social change,” she told the PBS television program “Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.” Sikhs first came to the U.S. 100 years ago, and they now number about half a million people. Many say they continue to face discrimination and misunderstanding. Sikh men