Guns

Published on Huffington Post. One year ago this morning, a lone gunman walked into a house of worship and stalked the prayer hall, communal kitchen and living rooms. Wherever he saw people, he lifted his gun without expression and fired. He killed six people and critically wounded others, including a police officer. The August 5, 2012 mass shooting in Oak Creek, Wisconsin received national attention for a few days, but then faded into the background as one in a list of mass shootings last year. One year later, people

By Kim Lawton Published on Washington Post. “The legacy of Oak Creek is not one of bloodshed,” said Valarie Kaur, founding director of the interfaith group Groundswell, a project of Auburn Seminary in N.Y. “(It’s of) how a community rose to bring people together to heal and to organize for lasting social change,” she told the PBS television program “Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.” Sikhs first came to the U.S. 100 years ago, and they now number about half a million people. Many say they continue to face discrimination and misunderstanding. Sikh men

Here is my interview reflecting on the one-year anniversary of the Oak Creek tragedy on PBS's Religion and Ethics Newsweekly. In the last year, I've witnessed the Sikh spirit of Chardi Kala, everlasting hope and optimism, even in suffering. This is the untold story of tragedy. Want to honor Oak Creek? Watch the Film. Join the Movement: http://www.groundswell-movement.org/the-one-year-anniversary-of-oak-creek  

The crisis is over; now the politics begins. On MSNBC, I debrief the Boston Marathon bombing and aftermath from the perspective of Muslim and Sikh American communities. America stands at a crossroads: Will we go down the road of fear and division, as we saw after 9/11? I believe another future is possible. Here's why. Valarie Kaur on MSNBC "Melissa Harris-Perry Show" April 21, 2013 from Sharat Raju on Vimeo.

Earlier this month, I was proud to take part in Odyssey Networks Town Hall Meeting: Guns and Violence, an interfaith panel of community leaders seeking to keep the debate going on how to fight violence and prevent further tragedy in our country. 2013 Odyssey Networks Town Hall Meeting from Auburn Seminary on Vimeo. As people of faith, we find ourselves now in a unique position to introduce moral persuasion into this debate and transcend partisan politics. TTo learn more on the role of faith and moral consciousness in the

Published by Vogue India. Sikh-American activist and film-maker Valarie Kaur is moving America with her passionate fight for a misunderstood community. By Aarti Virani WHO'S THAT GIRL? Over the weeks that followed the gut-wrenching massacre at a gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin last August–a tragedy that left seven (including the gunman) dead–a brave, young voice filled American airwaves. Even as she spoke for the rights of Sikh-Americans on a dizzying array of media platforms, Valarie Kaur propelled members of her grieving community to organize vigils, write op-eds and join forces

By Valarie Kaur and Sharat Raju Published on Huffington Post. Six months ago today, a small Midwestern town was rocked by a mass shooting at a house of worship. The massacre in Oak Creek, Wisconsin that claimed the lives of six people on August 5, 2012 is only one in a tragically long list of recent mass shootings. Yet in this political moment - when sustained public pressure could lead to real gun control reform - the Oak Creek tragedy and response offers a vital lesson: the efficacy of resilience. We

Published on Washington Post. When my plane landed in Connecticut early Friday afternoon, I was glad to be home. I had just spent the week in Oak Creek, Wis., with families of victims murdered in the mass shooting on Aug. 5, 2012 at a Sikh temple. Their grief is still fresh, and it was both heart-breaking and cathartic to facilitate discussion and healing. I could never have imagined that I would be traveling from the site of one mass shooting to another, this time in my own backyard. The

This morning, watching dawn break over New Haven, I see the faces of the young people I've met these many weeks during election season. In Philadelphia, college students struggling to walk the path of social justice in tough economic times, In Los Angeles, interfaith students figuring out how to answer their calling. In Washington, DC, Sikh Americans aching to serve their community in response to a rising tide of hate. And in my neighborhood in New Haven, young people of color coping with the sound of gunshots in

Published on Religion and Politics. Nestled in the suburbs of Hamden, Connecticut, a little brick building has been transformed into a gurdwara, a Sikh house of worship. Inside Gurdwara Sachkhand Darbar, dozens of families from the greater New Haven area gather for Sunday service. Most of those who attend services have lived in New England for more than twenty years; only a handful of them are recent immigrants. All listen intently to the kirtan, lips moving softly to the words of a prayer: “Tu Thakar Tum Pe Ardas Jiyo