Guns

The families of three Muslim college students killed last week in Chapel Hill, North Carolina received more than 3,000 messages and prayers of love and support from people across America. The prayers were collected by Groundswell Movement at Auburn Seminary and delivered to the local mosque in Raleigh, NC by Rabbi Eric Solomon of Beth Meyer Synagogue. "Groundswell collected thousands of notes from caring souls throughout the world who declared their willingness to stand in grieving solidarity with these families," Rabbi Solomon told the Barakat and Abu-Salha families. "May the souls

The shocking news out of Chapel Hill tears at my heart – 3 young Muslim students murdered in their home by an extremist with a gun. Many of our friends in the Muslim community are feeling alone, and wondering why this tragedy isn't getting the attention it deserves. In the midst of so much pain and suffering, let us stand with our Muslim American brothers and sisters. Please join me in offering a prayer or message in solidarity. Click here to offer your solidarity, love, or prayer. We'll share your prayers with

Hi everyone, Today, our minds and hearts are in Ferguson. In the face of sadness and despair, we still find hope in this: people of all colors and faiths from all corners of the country are calling for justice for Michael Brown - on the ground and online. Their courage reaffirms our commitment to protect the tool that makes this work possible -- a free and open Internet. Will you join us? Tell your story about how you use the Internet in your work for social justice. It's really simple.

During the "Weekend of Resistance" in Ferguson, Missouri, I appeared on "The Melissa Harris-Perry Show" to discuss  why the Weekend and #FergusonOctober calls upon us to confront not just police accountability but race in America. You can watch our panel's segment here: http://www.msnbc.com/melissa-harris-perry/watch/anti-police-violence-movement-draws-youth-340967491740

Two years ago today, six people of faith were killed, and many others wounded, in a mass shooting at the Sikh house of worship in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. It was the largest act of violence on a faith community in the US since the bombing of a Birmingham church that took four little girls 51 years ago. The shooting was a national tragedy, but what happened afterward is the most powerful story of healing and rebuilding I’ve ever witnessed. My husband and I had the chance to capture the community's

Today, families are gathering together around great bonfires in Northern India and around the world to celebrate Lohri, the harvest festival of Punjab. As a girl, I would blink at the growing flames, listen to the pounding of the dhol (drum), and hold my breath as family members stepped forward to announce good news of the last year: The birth of a daughter! A son's first day at school! A new job! A wedding! We would then jump up and dance around the fire, singing folk songs, throwing popcorn into the flames,

Published on CNN. The other night was one of the most sacred and extraordinary events of my life as an advocate. A gathering of people from all around our country with one thing in common: a desire to stop the gun violence that plagues their lives and continues to plague our nation. Marking the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, young Sikhs of Oak Creek organized a candlelight vigil against gun violence at the same gurdwara where six people were murdered. One would anticipate the one-year

Here's my interview with State of Belief discussing the one-year anniversary of Oak Creek. In the past twelve months, we have seen the Sikh community rebuild and unite in optimism and love to combat hate violence and domestic terrorism. Watch the video to learn more. Part I: Part II:

By Jessica Testa Published on BuzzFeed. Wade Michael Page didn’t speak to his victims before killing them. One year ago Monday, he “just began shooting.” On Aug. 5, 2012, Page walked into the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin with a 9-millimeter semiautomatic handgun. The 40-year-old Army veteran and skinhead musician killed six worshippers and wounded three others before an Oak Creek police officer shot him down. It was an act of hate — “domestic terrorism” — carried out on a group of people gathered to pray. As filmmaker and civil-rights advocate Valarie Kaur told BuzzFeed

Published on Washington Post. Today marks the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where a lone gunman killed six people in a Sikh house of worship. It was the largest hate-based act of violence on a faith community since the 1963 church bombings of the civil rights era. “I miss my mother every day,” said Harpreet Saini, who lost his mother in the shooting at age 18. “But I want to make her proud, so I’m honoring her memory through seva [service].” Harpreet Saini and the other young people of