May 2013

Here's my take on Angelina Jolie's story to pursue preventive care for breast cancer. On MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry Show, I talk about how women's health movements can use stories like Jolie's to break down economic and cultural barriers to care facing lower-income women and women of color, not just for breast cancer but for other less visible diseases such as myeloma and endometriosis.

Published on the Melissa Harris-Perry Blog, MSNBC Angelina Jolie’s medical condition is rare and few women could benefit from the genetic testing she received, but her New York Times op-ed has ignited a national conversation about barriers to care for breast cancer. In America today, white women are most likely to receive a breast cancer diagnosis, Asian women are least likely to screen for it, and black women are most likely to die from it. This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to women’s health in America. Millions more women suffer

Eighty-two year-old Piara Singh turned to walk home from his gurdwara (Sikh house of worship) in Fresno as he had done every morning for five years. But this day was different. He never made it home. He was assaulted from behind and brutally beaten with a steel rod, leaving him with multiple lacerations, broken ribs and a punctured lung. This happened in my hometown this month. I was heartbroken when I heard the news. Piara Singh could have been my grandfather. While local police are calling the assault of