Yale Tag

By Kathleen J. Sullivan Published by Stanford News. When facing the dangers of a courageous life, have faith, alumna Valarie Kaur told the graduates at Baccalaureate, a multi-faith celebration of thanksgiving and inspiration. "Faith in God or faith in goodness, faith that love can conquer death and darkness and despair, faith in yourself, faith in each other." Speaking to the Class of 2013, alumna Valarie Kaur said graduates don't need to be superhuman, super-smart, super fuzzy or super techie to stand up for what they believe in, but need only to

Originally published on CEASEFIRE. By Aisha Maniar On 5 October 2012, British citizens Babar Ahmad and Talha Ahsan lost their battle against extradition to the US on charges of alleged web-related support for insurgents in Chechnya and Afghanistan during the 1990s. Their arguments rested on claims that pre-trial and possible post-trial imprisonment in the US would be tantamount to cruel and degrading treatment. Appearing before a Connecticut court on 6 October, both men denied all charges against them. They have since been held in pre-trial solitary confinement at the Northern Correctional Institute in Connecticut,

Had the chance to discuss the efficacy of America's prison system and our latest documentary film The Worst of the Worst about solitary confinement. Really proud to share the work of the Yale Visual Law Project with a national audience on MSNBC. Watch the highlights: Valarie Kaur on MSNBC "Melissa Harris-Perry Show" Nov 18, 2012: America's Prisons and the Visual Law Project from Sharat Raju on Vimeo.

This morning, watching dawn break over New Haven, I see the faces of the young people I've met these many weeks during election season. In Philadelphia, college students struggling to walk the path of social justice in tough economic times, In Los Angeles, interfaith students figuring out how to answer their calling. In Washington, DC, Sikh Americans aching to serve their community in response to a rising tide of hate. And in my neighborhood in New Haven, young people of color coping with the sound of gunshots in

In law school, alongside dedicated classmates, I fought a case taking on a corrupt police department in East Haven, CT. It began one cold February night in the basement of a church, where Latino families gathered to tell stories of abuse and racial profiling at the hands of police officers. People were scared to come forward, but faith and community leaders in that local Catholic church urged them to tell their stories in the light of day. For the next several years, we waged a robust campaign.  The

By Amelia Earnest Published by Yale Daily News. A decade after the Sept. 11 attacks, Yale students are still discussing their effect on the way minorities are perceived in the United States. The South Asian Society at Yale, in collaboration with the Yale Chaplain’s Office and two other student groups, held a forum Monday night for reflection on racial profiling in the post-9/11 world as part of a series of University-wide events commemorating the 10-year anniversary of the attacks. The evening’s discussion addressed societal issues that have developed since 9/11, such

My letter to the editor of the New York Times, defending the moral vision of the Millennial generation, was published today. I'm thrilled to be given this chance to speak out for all of us working so hard toward our vision of a more just world. You can find the letter on the NYT website, and read it below. Re “If It Feels Right

As many of you know, for the last decade, I've had the opportunity to tour with Divided We Fall, leading dialogues on campuses and communities in 200 cities across the country. And I began to notice something -- a rising generation of people like me were tired of partisan politics and hungry for meaningful social action. Many of us found it in the campaign of President Obama. And while I'm proud to have worked on his campaign, it's clear now that we need more than a president

On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security and its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) launched a new "community outreach program" to soften ICE's negative image.  The program, tested in Chicago before launched nation-wide, will facilitate community partnerships "to combat stereotypes, mistrust, and misinformation that people hold about the department and agencies." The program's motto: Taking It to the Streets. Immigrant communities have taken it to the streets.  But not in the way ICE had in mind. They are protesting Secure Communities, a program created under the Obama Administration