terrorism Tag

Oslo is everywhere. As we see bodies recovered and hear stories of young people who survived the massacre, our hearts ache.  But in the last few days, we've learned that we are closer to the tragedy than we can imagine. The killer is not a "Muslim terrorist," as many conservatives in this country were quick to conclude.  Anders Breivik is a right-wing Christian directly influenced by a small group of anti-Muslim American bloggers and activists who claim that Muslim immigrants threaten western civilization. Robert Spencer, who runs Jihad Watch

Osama bin Laden's face is all over the television.  People are flooding the streets waving American flags.  The President speaks of our unity and resolve as a nation.  And 9/11 is on everyone's mind.  This has all happened before. Except this time, ten years after 9/11, we are not grieving death; we are celebrating death.  We have slain Osama bin Laden - the one who first slayed us.  And we are singing and laughing and high-fiving.  As if this is the end.  As if violence can end a

Watch this video. Fear and hate for Muslim Americans on full display at a protest against a charity fundraiser in Yorba Linda, California. Children walk past as protesters scream "TERRORIST" and "REMEMBER 9/11." I have a lump in my throat, but now is the time to speak, even if our voice trembles. The ten-year anniversary of 9/11 this year will invite more of this into the public square and our national discourse. Will we be ready to respond with smart, compassionate and courageous action? If you want to

In the last few weeks, as the national firestorm over the "Ground Zero Mosque" reached a deafening pitch, I have not been able to stop thinking about a handmade sign hanging in a gas station in Mesa, Arizona. On September 15, 2001, a turbaned Sikh man was murdered in front of this gas station, the first of at least two dozen people murdered in hate crimes in the months after 9/11. Neighbors and strangers sent hundreds of flowers and cards and messages, but the family chose this sign

Today, I was invited to present at Tubman Middle School in the inner-city of Augusta, Georgia. The students live in a depressed part of Augusta where textile workers used to live before the mills shut down. They have grown up with gang violence in their neighborhoods and go through routine weapons inspections at schools. These kids know violence. I have taken the film to middle-class kids at public and private schools but never inner-city kids with these kinds of experiences. I did not know what to expect. I had

August, 26-2005- Today was our very last day of interviews. It was only appropriate that our final two interviewees held opposing positions on how to defend American democracy in the post-9/11 era: one believes that we need to target undocumented immigrants and use racial profiling in security searches, and the other believes that such state policies are a form of public violence that encourage private hate violence. Both were intriguing. We first interviewed CLIFFORD MAY (pictured below), President of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He is

It is the eve of the fourth anniversary of September 11, the event that changed the world for many people and shifted the entire course of my life. In the aftermath of 9/11, I journeyed across America with my camera, documenting stories of hate violence against minority communities, including my own. Now four years later, I am a graduate student making a feature film about my journey. Still consumed by these stories and their questions, I traveled with my film crew to revisit Ground Zero on August

When the FBI arrested two Pakistani-Americans as suspected terrorists in Lodi, CA this June, the small farming town became the center of national and international media attention. But news media has not shown the extent to which the FBI has followed, monitored, and intimidated the greater Muslim American community there, including families who have lived and farmed in Lodi for generations. VEENA DUBAL, my classmate at Stanford, detailed the Lodi case in her article, The FBI Witch-Hunt in Lodi, California. Read her article for the entire story about

It is the day before production begins. Today we went to Kodak to pick up the film. Sharat and I stopped inside the office first to thank Candace, the woman who decided to give us our film stock at almost half the price. I met her for the first time and shook her hand. "This film is four years in the making. Thank you so much for making this possible." We have come this far because of people like her. People who helped us for no other reason