students Tag

As we reflect on 2013, I would like to share a video of my Baccalaureate address to Stanford University's Class of 2013. I had the honor of becoming the youngest person to deliver the address, and the first from the Sikh tradition. But I offer the call to "enter the whirlwind" for people of all faiths, and all ages. Read the prepared text of my speech below: President Hennessy, Dean McLennan, professors and staff, family and friends, and the Class of 2013, it is a profound gift for me

By Kathleen J. Sullivan Published by Stanford News. When facing the dangers of a courageous life, have faith, alumna Valarie Kaur told the graduates at Baccalaureate, a multi-faith celebration of thanksgiving and inspiration. "Faith in God or faith in goodness, faith that love can conquer death and darkness and despair, faith in yourself, faith in each other." Speaking to the Class of 2013, alumna Valarie Kaur said graduates don't need to be superhuman, super-smart, super fuzzy or super techie to stand up for what they believe in, but need only to

In law school, alongside dedicated classmates, I fought a case taking on a corrupt police department in East Haven, CT. It began one cold February night in the basement of a church, where Latino families gathered to tell stories of abuse and racial profiling at the hands of police officers. People were scared to come forward, but faith and community leaders in that local Catholic church urged them to tell their stories in the light of day. For the next several years, we waged a robust campaign.  The

By Amelia Earnest Published by Yale Daily News. A decade after the Sept. 11 attacks, Yale students are still discussing their effect on the way minorities are perceived in the United States. The South Asian Society at Yale, in collaboration with the Yale Chaplain’s Office and two other student groups, held a forum Monday night for reflection on racial profiling in the post-9/11 world as part of a series of University-wide events commemorating the 10-year anniversary of the attacks. The evening’s discussion addressed societal issues that have developed since 9/11, such

Tonight, I write from Iona College, a small college founded by Christian Brothers in New Rochelle.  Dr. Teresa Delgado invited me as part of Iona's Week of the Peacemaker "Advocacy: Speaking out for Justice" -- a series of talks, films, and teach-ins that inform and inspire college students to advocate for justice. We just screened Divided We Fall for 50 college students, followed by an intimate discussion about the ways in which 9/11 still claims us. Students began by sharing memories of the terrorist attacks: one student almost lost

Today, I was invited to present at Tubman Middle School in the inner-city of Augusta, Georgia. The students live in a depressed part of Augusta where textile workers used to live before the mills shut down. They have grown up with gang violence in their neighborhoods and go through routine weapons inspections at schools. These kids know violence. I have taken the film to middle-class kids at public and private schools but never inner-city kids with these kinds of experiences. I did not know what to expect. I had