Sikh Tag

Published on Huffington Post. The following remarks were delivered by Valarie Kaur at The White House on November 20, 2013. Waheguru Ji Ka Kalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Thank you to President Obama and his staff for gathering us in the White House to celebrate Gurpurab, the birth of Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh faith. I am deeply honored to reflect on the story of our faith with you. The story begins halfway around the world in Punjab with the birth of a humble herdsman named Nanak in

Published on the blog for the Middle East Studies Center at Ohio State University. We had the honor of co-hosting Valarie Kaur with the Multicultural Center, OSU Hillel, Mundo, OSU First Year Experience, the Office of Student Life, Asian American Association, Better Together, Indian Student Association, and the South Asian Student Association. Twelve years ago,  in the wake of September 11, 2001, Kaur set off across the country to discover the stories of those affected by this post-9/11 anger and hatred toward what Mahmoud has called "Muslim-looking others".  Since September 11th Sikhs, who often wear

Published on Melissa Harris-Perry Blog, MSNBC. Last Saturday night, a young man dropped his wife and one-year old at home and went for a walk in Harlem. Soon thereafter, he heard “Get Osama!” Twenty men on bicycles chased him down, pulled his beard, and punched him to the ground. The blows would not stop as his assailants called him a “terrorist.” When bystanders came to his aid, he was rushed to the hospital, his face bloody and bruised, and his jaw fractured. The victim, Dr. Prabhjot Singh, is a young professor

I'm deeply honored to be included in Audrey Magazine's list of influential Asian American women, especially alongside two of my heroes, Grace Lee Boggs and Somaly Mam. These women have inspired me for years to follow in their footsteps as strong women of color. Check out the video below to learn more or go here to read full profiles for all eight women. Profile: Valarie Kaur By Audrey Magazine On September 11, 2001, Valarie Kaur watched in horror, along with her fellow Americans, as the two towers fell. A third generation

Published on CNN. The other night was one of the most sacred and extraordinary events of my life as an advocate. A gathering of people from all around our country with one thing in common: a desire to stop the gun violence that plagues their lives and continues to plague our nation. Marking the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, young Sikhs of Oak Creek organized a candlelight vigil against gun violence at the same gurdwara where six people were murdered. One would anticipate the one-year

Here's my interview with State of Belief discussing the one-year anniversary of Oak Creek. In the past twelve months, we have seen the Sikh community rebuild and unite in optimism and love to combat hate violence and domestic terrorism. Watch the video to learn more. Part I: Part II:

By Jessica Testa Published on BuzzFeed. Wade Michael Page didn’t speak to his victims before killing them. One year ago Monday, he “just began shooting.” On Aug. 5, 2012, Page walked into the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin with a 9-millimeter semiautomatic handgun. The 40-year-old Army veteran and skinhead musician killed six worshippers and wounded three others before an Oak Creek police officer shot him down. It was an act of hate — “domestic terrorism” — carried out on a group of people gathered to pray. As filmmaker and civil-rights advocate Valarie Kaur told BuzzFeed

By Sean Lewis Published on WGN Chicago. In the rain, the community of Oak Creek Wisconsin came together, remembering the tragedy here one year ago. To this day, no one knows why gunman, white supremacist and army veteran wade Michael Page walked into the Sikh Temple on a Sunday morning and began to shoot.  He killed six people and injured many others before he shot and killed himself. “This is not just a Sikh tragedy, this is an American tragedy,” Filmmaker Valarie Kaur has spent the last year talking with the victims

Published on the Melissa Harris-Perry Blog, MSNBC. One year after a gunman murdered six people and wounded many more at a Sikh house of worship in Oak Creek, WI, Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the Justice Department will begin tracking hate crimes against Sikh Americans and six other groups for the first time in U.S. history. Sikh-Americans, along with Hindus, Arabs, Buddhists, Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Orthodox Christians who are victims of hate crimes will finally be counted on the Hate Crime Incident Report form. Adding specific categories

Published on Washington Post. Today marks the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where a lone gunman killed six people in a Sikh house of worship. It was the largest hate-based act of violence on a faith community since the 1963 church bombings of the civil rights era. “I miss my mother every day,” said Harpreet Saini, who lost his mother in the shooting at age 18. “But I want to make her proud, so I’m honoring her memory through seva [service].” Harpreet Saini and the other young people of