Muslims Tag

This post originally appeared on Upworthy.  by Isabel Evans Donald Trump called for an end to all Muslim immigration into the United States and it was pretty scary. That’s old news by now. But the cool part you might not have heard about? As a response, a group of faith leaders from lots of different religions united in support of Muslims. On Dec. 9, 2015, those faith leaders published an open letter to the American Muslim community pledging solidarity, love, and support to Muslims "with our voices, our actions, and our bodies." The organizers of the

The shocking news out of Chapel Hill tears at my heart – 3 young Muslim students murdered in their home by an extremist with a gun. Many of our friends in the Muslim community are feeling alone, and wondering why this tragedy isn't getting the attention it deserves. In the midst of so much pain and suffering, let us stand with our Muslim American brothers and sisters. Please join me in offering a prayer or message in solidarity. Click here to offer your solidarity, love, or prayer. We'll share your prayers with

By Valarie Kaur and Jessica Jenkins Published on Huffington Post. It is a basic fact of the moral universe that children should not be sold for sexual exploitation.  However, in America, girls and boys are regularly manipulated, coerced, and forced into sex for money.  Most are trafficked from within the United States, not far-off foreign lands. Many are as young as eleven or twelve. And many are sold on prominent Web sites such as Backpage.com, owned by Village Voice Media. This morning, an unexpected coalition of faith and moral leaders

By Everett Rosenfeld Published by Yale Daily News. When Valarie Kaur LAW ’11 first heard about Ahmed Sharif, the New York City cab driver who was attacked Aug. 24 by a drunken passenger for being Muslim, she did not know how to respond. “We are witnessing a wave of hate crimes across the country, not fully being covered on the news,” she said. “This [situation] is becoming insidious, life-threatening, and serious, but I found myself in a paralysis.” Within a week, Matthew Matera LAW ’11 came to her room to talk about

To commemorate the four-year anniversary of the murder of Balbir Sodhi, Arizona's East Valley Tribune ran a front page article about his story and our film Divided We Fall. Sikhs Still Living in the Shadow of Sept. 11. Nick Martin On a Saturday in 2001, less than two weeks after the S ept. 11 terrorist attacks, thousands gathered at Phoenix Civic Plaza to honor a man most had never met. (Gaurav Singh, a relative of Balbir Singh Sodhi, kneels by a memorial outside the Mesa Star Convenience store where Sodhi was

August, 26-2005- Today was our very last day of interviews. It was only appropriate that our final two interviewees held opposing positions on how to defend American democracy in the post-9/11 era: one believes that we need to target undocumented immigrants and use racial profiling in security searches, and the other believes that such state policies are a form of public violence that encourage private hate violence. Both were intriguing. We first interviewed CLIFFORD MAY (pictured below), President of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He is

Today we filmed the streets and skyline of Manhattan, the Statue of Liberty, and finally we returned to Ground Zero. There we met AMRIK CHAWLA (pictured), a Brooklyn-raised Sikh American, who first told me his story in December 2001. Amrik was probably the very first victim of a hate crime after 9/11. It happened only minutes after the second plane hit the Towers. That Tuesday morning, Amrik was in a cab three blocks south of the Towers, on his way to work when traffic stopped. He saw the

When the FBI arrested two Pakistani-Americans as suspected terrorists in Lodi, CA this June, the small farming town became the center of national and international media attention. But news media has not shown the extent to which the FBI has followed, monitored, and intimidated the greater Muslim American community there, including families who have lived and farmed in Lodi for generations. VEENA DUBAL, my classmate at Stanford, detailed the Lodi case in her article, The FBI Witch-Hunt in Lodi, California. Read her article for the entire story about

We interviewed Nitasha Sawhney, a lawyer at Burke, Williams, and Sorenson, LLP in Los Angeles, who has focused her energy on civil rights cases on behalf of Sikh Americans since 9/11, including Swaran Bhullar. As a Sikh American lawyer and activist, she spoke with great passion about her community's experiences. She feared that many Sikhs have simply become accustomed the prejudice they face daily. And she hopes that with enough education and advocacy, people may begin to recognize one another as Americans: "As long as there is a