Boston Tag

The crisis is over; now the politics begins. On MSNBC, I debrief the Boston Marathon bombing and aftermath from the perspective of Muslim and Sikh American communities. America stands at a crossroads: Will we go down the road of fear and division, as we saw after 9/11? I believe another future is possible. Here's why. Valarie Kaur on MSNBC "Melissa Harris-Perry Show" April 21, 2013 from Sharat Raju on Vimeo.

Published on Washington Post. With the news that two suspects of the Boston Marathon bombing are accounted for, one dead and the other in custody, I breathed a sigh of relief. A terror-stricken week that began with bombings and ended with shootouts was finally over. But the moment the suspects were identified as Muslim marked a new period of anxiety and vulnerability for millions of Muslim, Arab, and South Asian Americans, including me. As a Sikh American who has chronicled hate crimes and profiling against our communities since Sept. 11,

The doors of the classroom swing open and thirty middle school kids tumble in, talking, giggling, tugging at each other, bouncing with energy.I am nervous. Divided We Fall has never been shown to junior high school students – we had aimed the film for colleges and high schools, but when the Fayerweather Street School invited me to teach their seventh and eighth grade class for a day, I was curious. I've planned to show the movie in the morning and discuss in the afternoon. Now, standing in the back

After premiering in Phoenix and New York, we made our BOSTON PREMIERE at Tufts University on October 25, hosted by the Asian American Center. It was a full audience once again, but this time, it was made up mostly of college students, many of whom experienced 9/11 as freshmen in high school. Linell Yugawa, our gracious host and director of the Asian American Center, introduced us. We introduced Divided We Fall: Americans in the Aftermath. And it began. This time, Sharat and I sat in the back to

It is Christmas Eve in the world. I am at home with my family after many months. I finally have a moment to reflect. Since September, I have lived a split life. On weekdays, I am in Boston keeping up appearances as a graduate student at Harvard Divinity, and on weekends, I am a filmmaker in Los Angeles, working in a tiny editing room on our documentary. We are in the final phase of Divided We Fall, shaping our two-hour rough cut into a polished completed film to

Here is a brief introduction to the SIKH RELIGION, as per the request of our First Camera Assistant Don Presley. This is the introduction I prepared in April 2005 for the Harvard Divinity School community, where I study ethics as a graduate student. With the help of local gurdwaras and the noon service steering committee, we organized the first Sikh service in the history of Harvard Divinity to celebrate Vaisakhi, a special Sikh holiday. The service began with this introduction, which I read to the gathering (pictured): "SIKHISM is

Here are images from the film, taken over the last few years: Vandalism at my gurdwara (Sikh house of worship) last year in Fresno, California, where I grew up. A poster for the film that features Sher Singh, the Sikh man who was arrested off a Boston-bound train on September 12, 2001, as the first suspected terrorist. Although his charges were dropped within hours, footage of his arrest played on national media outlets for three days. (Poster by Raj Dhillon) A collage of faces and places from our journey,