Auburn seminary Tag

This post originally appeared on Upworthy.  by Isabel Evans Donald Trump called for an end to all Muslim immigration into the United States and it was pretty scary. That’s old news by now. But the cool part you might not have heard about? As a response, a group of faith leaders from lots of different religions united in support of Muslims. On Dec. 9, 2015, those faith leaders published an open letter to the American Muslim community pledging solidarity, love, and support to Muslims "with our voices, our actions, and our bodies." The organizers of the

Sign our letter of solidarity with the Muslim community in America. The letter says: America is not America without Muslims. As people of faith and moral conscience, we promise to defend our Muslim brothers and sisters from attack, to speak up when they are maligned, and to support them with our voices, our actions, and our bodies. We’re going to send this letter and a copy of the signatories to the media, as well as to as many mosques and Muslim community centers as possible.  Together, thousands of us can speak

My reflection on the Pope's historic U.S. visit alongside faith leaders I love and respect: A Pope for People of All Faiths by FaithSource at Auburn Seminary Originally published on OnFaith.  A single image from Pope Francis’ visit to America is seared in my mind. At an interfaith service at the 9/11 Memorial, the pope paused on stage when he met Gunisha Kaur — a fellow Sikh woman who has fought tirelessly for human rights and is now carrying her first child. The pope lowered his head, lifted his palms, and offered a

Click here to add your prayer or message of solidarity for the families of Charleston in the wake of the AME shooting. Within hours, Groundswell, Auburn Seminary’s online platform, collected and continues to deliver some 8,000 prayers from people of all faiths and beliefs in response to the horrific murders at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. Some of America’s top faith leaders shared their prayers, heartbreak, and humanity and we offer them here: “There were gun shots in a place of prayer and peace. Cries of terror filled the

Published by The Legacy Project. Valarie Kaur is a national interfaith leader, documentary filmmaker, and lawyer who centers her work around the power of storytelling. She is the founder of Groundswell at Auburn Seminary, a non-profit initiative with 100,000 members that equips people of faith in social movements. Working with students and communities, she has made award-winning films and led campaigns on hate crimes, gun violence, racial profiling, immigration detention, and solitary confinement. Valarie is a prolific public speaker on college and university campuses and frequent political contributor on MSNBC to the Melissa Harris-Perry Show. Her opinion

Today, families are gathering together around great bonfires in Northern India and around the world to celebrate Lohri, the harvest festival of Punjab. As a girl, I would blink at the growing flames, listen to the pounding of the dhol (drum), and hold my breath as family members stepped forward to announce good news of the last year: The birth of a daughter! A son's first day at school! A new job! A wedding! We would then jump up and dance around the fire, singing folk songs, throwing popcorn into the flames,

Earlier this month, I was proud to take part in Odyssey Networks Town Hall Meeting: Guns and Violence, an interfaith panel of community leaders seeking to keep the debate going on how to fight violence and prevent further tragedy in our country. 2013 Odyssey Networks Town Hall Meeting from Auburn Seminary on Vimeo. As people of faith, we find ourselves now in a unique position to introduce moral persuasion into this debate and transcend partisan politics. TTo learn more on the role of faith and moral consciousness in the

The Center for American Progress has compiled a list of thirteen progressive faith leaders to watch in 2013. I'm incredibly honored to be included at number six among such distinguished colleagues! 2012 presented us with unprecedented challenges in the fight for equality and civil liberties, and our work is far from complete. Here's to the good work ahead. Check out the 12 other progressive faith leaders to watch here. Valarie Kaur—a filmmaker, civil rights advocate, and organizer—is a standout figure in the world of interfaith organizing and activism. In addition to helping

Published by The Interfaith Observer. A Virtual Community Empowering Grassroots Interfaith Communities When a dozen twenty-somethings gathered in my tiny living room in the fall of 2010, vexed about the firestorm of protest against Park 51, an Islamic center planned in Manhattan known as “the Ground Zero Mosque,” we had no idea that we were planting the seed for a movement. We were Christian, Muslim, Jew, Sikh, Buddhist, Hindu and Humanist Millennials who had come of age in the decade after September 11, 2001. All of us were tired of

“We need to have an ‘American spring’… nonviolent change where people from the grassroots get involved again.”  – Former Vice President Al Gore, August 2011 We’re hungry for a movement. Faith and moral communities around the globe are tired of politics that maintain the status quo. Here in the U.S., a rising generation is finding brave new ways to channel moral vision into action: we’re marching in the streets for immigration reform, holding the banner of marriage equality, pushing back on anti-Muslim rhetoric, and demanding an end to