Yale Law School Tag

Published on CNN. Editor’s note: Barbara van Schewick is an expert on net neutrality, a professor at Stanford Law School and director of the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. She is the author of “Internet Architecture and Innovation.” Follow her on Twitter at @vanschewick. Valarie Kaur, a media and strategy fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society, contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. On Wednesday, millions of Americans visiting their favorite websites will

Published by The Legacy Project. Valarie Kaur is a national interfaith leader, documentary filmmaker, and lawyer who centers her work around the power of storytelling. She is the founder of Groundswell at Auburn Seminary, a non-profit initiative with 100,000 members that equips people of faith in social movements. Working with students and communities, she has made award-winning films and led campaigns on hate crimes, gun violence, racial profiling, immigration detention, and solitary confinement. Valarie is a prolific public speaker on college and university campuses and frequent political contributor on MSNBC to the Melissa Harris-Perry Show. Her opinion

Had the chance to discuss the efficacy of America's prison system and our latest documentary film The Worst of the Worst about solitary confinement. Really proud to share the work of the Yale Visual Law Project with a national audience on MSNBC. Watch the highlights:

In law school, alongside dedicated classmates, I fought a case taking on a corrupt police department in East Haven, CT. It began one cold February night in the basement of a church, where Latino families gathered to tell stories of abuse and racial profiling at the hands of police officers. People were scared to come forward, but faith and community leaders in that local Catholic church urged them to tell their stories in the light of day. For the next several years, we waged a robust campaign.  The

As many of you know, for the last decade, I've had the opportunity to tour with Divided We Fall, leading dialogues on campuses and communities in 200 cities across the country. And I began to notice something -- a rising generation of people like me were tired of partisan politics and hungry for meaningful social action. Many of us found it in the campaign of President Obama. And while I'm proud to have worked on his campaign, it's clear now that we need more than a president

On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security and its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) launched a new "community outreach program" to soften ICE's negative image.  The program, tested in Chicago before launched nation-wide, will facilitate community partnerships "to combat stereotypes, mistrust, and misinformation that people hold about the department and agencies." The program's motto: Taking It to the Streets. Immigrant communities have taken it to the streets.  But not in the way ICE had in mind. They are protesting Secure Communities, a program created under the Obama Administration

The Associated Press just covered our clinic's case against racial profiling in East Haven, CT.  Here's the story as published in the Washington Post: Citing police abuse, Hispanics leaving Conn. town -- By MICHAEL MELIA The Associated Press Sunday, December 26, 2010; 3:22 PM EAST HAVEN, Conn. -- Santiago Malave has worked law enforcement jobs in Connecticut for more than four decades, but as a Puerto Rican, he says he cannot drive through his own town without worrying about police harassing him. Malave, a probation officer who works in New Haven, says the racial

For the last year and a half, I've worked as part of a coalition of church leaders, residents, lawyers and fellow Yale law students to fight against racial profiling in East Haven, CT.  I was proud to join them to announce our next major action: filing a civil rights lawsuit on behalf of our clients in federal court.  Our press conference on television:

We are filing a major lawsuit tomorrow on behalf of clients who have endured racial profiling and police brutality in East Haven, CT.  Our clients' story just made the New York Times: Latino Immigrants to Sue a Connecticut Police Dept., Asserting Racial Bias By SAM DOLNICK When Yadanny García asked police officers in East Haven, Conn., why they were ordering him to the ground, they shocked him three times with a Taser gun, punched him and told him to “go back to your country.” When José Luis Albaraccín was arrested after

We're very pleased to land on the front page of today's New Haven Register.  The reporter Mary O'Leary captured the spirit of our campaign.  Worth the full read: Students' New Campaign Fights Islamophobia Mary O'Leary - September 13, 2010 NEW HAVEN — Valarie Kaur is an award-winning filmmaker who has fought racism for the past nine years, and still she found herself overwhelmed and paralyzed by the anti-Muslim sentiment flowing from controversy over the planned Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York. A student at the Yale Law School, Kaur said the