Sharat Raju Tag

This election season, campuses and communities across the country will host 100 FILM SCREENINGS and DIALOGUES on Revolutionary Love. They will screen our film Divided We Fall, the first documentary film to chronicle the struggles of Sikh and Muslim Americans in the aftermath of 9/11 and their resilience in the aftermath of violence. This is the first call to action of the Revolutionary Love Project, my new initiative at University of Southern California ORL. Click on any public event below to join a dialogue near you. Or sign up

Tonight is the night! My husband and filmmaking partner Sharat Raju directed an episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - and it airs tonight 9 PM Eastern/Pacific on NBC! The episode is superb: a powerful, provocative, and morally complex story that takes on the issue of domestic violence inspired by the Ray Rice case. An example of the power of storytelling for deep dialogue and social change via television. It will also keep you on the edge of your seat. OK, I might be a bit biased, but even the SVU

Two years ago today, six people of faith were killed, and many others wounded, in a mass shooting at the Sikh house of worship in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. It was the largest act of violence on a faith community in the US since the bombing of a Birmingham church that took four little girls 51 years ago. The shooting was a national tragedy, but what happened afterward is the most powerful story of healing and rebuilding I’ve ever witnessed. My husband and I had the chance to capture the community's

By Annabelle Estera, Asian Pacific American Network, Ohio State University One of the best parts of my job is the ability to bring in engaging, thought-provoking, and inspiring speakers. On November 14th, The Ohio State University welcomed filmmaker, civil rights advocate, and interfaith leader, Valarie Kaur to campus. There was a full day of activities planned, including a lunch, workshop, and dinner with staff and students, culminating with an evening screening of her 2006 documentary “Divided We Fall: Americans in the Aftermath,” which tells the story of her travels around the country documenting

Today, families are gathering together around great bonfires in Northern India and around the world to celebrate Lohri, the harvest festival of Punjab. As a girl, I would blink at the growing flames, listen to the pounding of the dhol (drum), and hold my breath as family members stepped forward to announce good news of the last year: The birth of a daughter! A son's first day at school! A new job! A wedding! We would then jump up and dance around the fire, singing folk songs, throwing popcorn into the flames,

Breaking news! On Wednesday afternoon, an FBI advisory policy board voted to track hate crimes against Sikh, Hindu, and Arab Americans. We did this together! On August 5th, 2012, six Sikh Americans were murdered in a gurdwara (Sikh house of worship) in one of the greatest hate-based mass shootings in recent U.S. history. Within 48 hours, thousands of Groundswell members sent prayers and messages of solidarity from all over the country. I delivered them in Wisconsin the first Sunday after the mass shooting. And in the following months, you signed and shared the petition telling

Published on Common Ground News Service. Oak Creek, Wisconsin - On Friday, I participated in a memorial for the victims of the 4 August shooting in a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. I am a third-generation Sikh American, and as the ceremony drew to a close, I tweeted, “May this not be the last moment the nation watches and mourns with us. May this be the start of lasting solidarity.” Now is the time that we, as Americans already embroiled in an increasingly bitter election year, must curb

Appeared on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show. I'm honored to be featured on one of my favorite shows on TV by the smartest, most compassionate host I know, Melissa Harris-Perry.  She discusses my call for efforts to build a world without terror and includes footage my partner Sharat Raju and I shot this week in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.

Published on The Washington Post. One day after Wade Michael Page opened fire and killed six Sikh Americans at a Milwaukee temple, the head of the U.S. Air Force Academy confused Sikhs with Muslims during a briefing before students and staff. Lt. Gen. Michael Gould is superintendent of the Colorado Springs military school. His job is to help educate, train and inspire the 4,000 young men and women at the academy to become “officers of character,” according to the school’s mission statement. Yet this highly decorated, well-educated military leader

Sikhs are half a million strong in the U.S. and belong to the fifth largest organized religion in the world. Our faith was established in 1469 in present-day Northern India and Pakistan. Our first teacher, Guru Nanak, called for devotion to One God, equality between all people, and a commitment to service – all ideals compatible with the American ethic. We pray in houses of worship called gurdwaras, where we gather together to recite and sing our sacred scriptures, poetry in praise of God. Like other religious