Punjab Tag

Two years ago today, six people of faith were killed, and many others wounded, in a mass shooting at the Sikh house of worship in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. It was the largest act of violence on a faith community in the US since the bombing of a Birmingham church that took four little girls 51 years ago. The shooting was a national tragedy, but what happened afterward is the most powerful story of healing and rebuilding I’ve ever witnessed. My husband and I had the chance to capture the community's

Today, families are gathering together around great bonfires in Northern India and around the world to celebrate Lohri, the harvest festival of Punjab. As a girl, I would blink at the growing flames, listen to the pounding of the dhol (drum), and hold my breath as family members stepped forward to announce good news of the last year: The birth of a daughter! A son's first day at school! A new job! A wedding! We would then jump up and dance around the fire, singing folk songs, throwing popcorn into the flames,

Published on Huffington Post If you ask Sikhs about their religion, the first thing you will hear is belief in the Oneness of God. The second is that Sikh men wear turbans to cover their long hair, an article of faith which tragically became a target after 9/11 (See, I just did it). But if you linger a minute longer, you will hear us beam about the equality of women in our faith. Unlike in most other religions, our scriptures are explicit about women as equal in the eyes of

Here is a brief introduction to the SIKH RELIGION, as per the request of our First Camera Assistant Don Presley. This is the introduction I prepared in April 2005 for the Harvard Divinity School community, where I study ethics as a graduate student. With the help of local gurdwaras and the noon service steering committee, we organized the first Sikh service in the history of Harvard Divinity to celebrate Vaisakhi, a special Sikh holiday. The service began with this introduction, which I read to the gathering (pictured): "SIKHISM is

This weekend, we are in Clovis, my hometown near Fresno in California's Central Valley. My grandfather Kehar Singh came here from Punjab, India in 1913 and farmed for decades. My father was born on this land. And so was I. My family's house is still built on the corner of the old farmland. But it looks very different now. What used to be vast farmland and orchards has now been turned into suburbs and strip malls. In just the past year, my grandfather's land has been sold

Once again, I am living out of my suitcase. This happens a lot. Ever since September 11, 2001, my suitcase has been my home. That single event, that single day, has determined every part of my life. What I study. What I do. Who I know myself to be. And where I am. On this particular night, I am in Los Angeles, writing from a production office—a film production office. The place is an organized mess. Two rooms packed with editing equipment, camera gear, computers, stacks of papers