Open Internet Tag

I am moved to be on this list, but even more proud to see my boss, Stanford Professor Barbara van Schewick, at the top - for having "a bigger impact than entire institutions." She is extraordinary. I am so glad that Marvin shared the work of the many women who have fought over the past year and a half for an open internet: Please read and then share this article to shine a light on the many incredible women leading technology and social change.   The Women Who Won Net Neutrality By Marvin Ammori You can

This article originally appeared on The Huffington Post. On Tuesday, July 28th, a diverse group of faith leaders and advocates posted the same video on the Twitter and Facebook feeds of  more than one million people. Backers of the video came from a wide range of civil rights causes -- racial justice, LGBTQ equality, economic justice, religious pluralism and more. What's the unlikely hashtag that unites them? #NetNeutrality. The new video from Faithful Internet shows how the open Internet has become the lifeblood of today's social movements -- #BlackLivesMatter, #99Percent, #LoveWins and more. It celebrates the 2015 Open

This piece original appeared in On Faith. Today, the Open Internet Order becomes effective. Adopted after a year of national debate, the order codifies “net neutrality” — the principle that keeps the Internet an open and democratic space. Specifically, it bans carriers like Comcast and Verizon from blocking and slowing down websites at will, or charging sites extra fees to reach people faster. Why are Americans of all faiths and beliefs celebrating? If carriers created “fast lanes” online, most faith and non-profit groups could not afford to be in them.

As the Open Internet Order goes into effect today, I wanted to make sure that you saw what faith leaders are saying about the importance a free and open web: You can read the original article on the Huffington Post. By Carol Kuruvilla The Open Internet Order has gone into effect -- protecting what faith leaders are calling the “fundamental right” of Internet freedom. Along with demanding more transparency from broadband companies, the Federal Communications Commission’s order prevents providers from blocking, slowing down, or allowing paid prioritization of websites. As part of a campaign

Friends ask me why I've taken on Internet freedom as part of my advocacy work. Click below to hear my 12-minute interview on "State of Belief" radio with Rev. Welton Gaddy explaining why: You can also read the transcript: Interfaith Alliance State of Belief Radio March 14, 2015 TRANSCRIPT: REV. DR. C. WELTON GADDY, HOST: This past week, I noticed a strident column in the conservativeWashington Timesdecrying the Federal Communication Commission’s new rules on Net Neutrality asan existential threat to religious freedom. Huh? Joining me now to shed some light on this issue is

By Valarie Kaur and Cheryl Leanza This week, a handful of Republicans will hold hearings on the Hill to challenge new federal rules protecting the Internet. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reclassified providers who connect us to the Internet as common carriers and adopted strong rules banning them from blocking or slowing down sites and charging access fees. The vote is already touted as among the greatest public interest victories in U.S. history, most vocally by the tech world. But also among those celebrating this vote are America’s Christians, Jews,

If you recognize my name, it's because we're connected in a magical way. Four years ago, I founded Groundswell because I had a dream – to connect people of faith to build a moral movement for justice. Today, you and me and over 100,000 others have taken faithful action together! We built this movement with a lot of heart – and with the help of the Internet. But right now the Internet is under attack, and I'm in the fight to save it. There's a big vote this Thursday and if

Hi everyone, Today, our minds and hearts are in Ferguson. In the face of sadness and despair, we still find hope in this: people of all colors and faiths from all corners of the country are calling for justice for Michael Brown - on the ground and online. Their courage reaffirms our commitment to protect the tool that makes this work possible -- a free and open Internet. Will you join us? Tell your story about how you use the Internet in your work for social justice. It's really simple.

Published on CNN. Editor’s note: Barbara van Schewick is an expert on net neutrality, a professor at Stanford Law School and director of the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. She is the author of “Internet Architecture and Innovation.” Follow her on Twitter at @vanschewick. Valarie Kaur, a media and strategy fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society, contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. On Wednesday, millions of Americans visiting their favorite websites will