Muslim Tag

This election season, campuses and communities across the country will host 100 FILM SCREENINGS and DIALOGUES on Revolutionary Love. They will screen our film Divided We Fall, the first documentary film to chronicle the struggles of Sikh and Muslim Americans in the aftermath of 9/11 and their resilience in the aftermath of violence. This is the first call to action of the Revolutionary Love Project, my new initiative at University of Southern California ORL. Click on any public event below to join a dialogue near you. Or sign up

The way that America commemorates the 15 year anniversary of 9/11 will shape our nation's future. Will we honor the dead by recommitting our nation to love? Or will we allow 9/11 to be used to incite hate and violence this election season? As a Sikh mother, the question is a matter of life or death. Because on every 9/11 anniversary, we see an astounding rise in hate against Muslim and Sikh Americans - profiling, bullying, beatings, and killings. That's why, for the first time ever, we are releasing our

Published on the blog for the Middle East Studies Center at Ohio State University. We had the honor of co-hosting Valarie Kaur with the Multicultural Center, OSU Hillel, Mundo, OSU First Year Experience, the Office of Student Life, Asian American Association, Better Together, Indian Student Association, and the South Asian Student Association. Twelve years ago,  in the wake of September 11, 2001, Kaur set off across the country to discover the stories of those affected by this post-9/11 anger and hatred toward what Mahmoud has called "Muslim-looking others".  Since September 11th Sikhs, who often wear

By Kim Lawton Published on Washington Post. “The legacy of Oak Creek is not one of bloodshed,” said Valarie Kaur, founding director of the interfaith group Groundswell, a project of Auburn Seminary in N.Y. “(It’s of) how a community rose to bring people together to heal and to organize for lasting social change,” she told the PBS television program “Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.” Sikhs first came to the U.S. 100 years ago, and they now number about half a million people. Many say they continue to face discrimination and misunderstanding. Sikh men

By Kathleen J. Sullivan Published by Stanford News. When facing the dangers of a courageous life, have faith, alumna Valarie Kaur told the graduates at Baccalaureate, a multi-faith celebration of thanksgiving and inspiration. "Faith in God or faith in goodness, faith that love can conquer death and darkness and despair, faith in yourself, faith in each other." Speaking to the Class of 2013, alumna Valarie Kaur said graduates don't need to be superhuman, super-smart, super fuzzy or super techie to stand up for what they believe in, but need only to

The crisis is over; now the politics begins. On MSNBC, I debrief the Boston Marathon bombing and aftermath from the perspective of Muslim and Sikh American communities. America stands at a crossroads: Will we go down the road of fear and division, as we saw after 9/11? I believe another future is possible. Here's why.

Published on Washington Post. With the news that two suspects of the Boston Marathon bombing are accounted for, one dead and the other in custody, I breathed a sigh of relief. A terror-stricken week that began with bombings and ended with shootouts was finally over. But the moment the suspects were identified as Muslim marked a new period of anxiety and vulnerability for millions of Muslim, Arab, and South Asian Americans, including me. As a Sikh American who has chronicled hate crimes and profiling against our communities since Sept. 11,

Published on The Washington Post. In the chaos of bullets, riots, and the murder of an ambassador and three other U.S. citizens, a congressional hearing held in a quiet corner of the U.S. Senate holds the key to understanding the many costs of homegrown hate. On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the threat of hate groups and domestic extremism in America. The hearing is historic. While Congress has held dozens of hearings on the threat of al-Qaeda and its affiliates, this will be the first

Published on The Washington Post. In the aftermath of the mass shooting in a Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wis., a sea of reporters have asked many Sikh leaders and activists to quantify how many Sikhs had been targeted in hate crimes and murders since Sept. 11, 2001. Although I have helped chronicle hate crimes against the Sikh American community for more than a decade, I could not tell them. Even as the White House, U.S. Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation express their commitment to protecting

Published on The Huffington Post. By Valarie Kaur and Simran Jeet Singh Why do we wear turbans?" Nearly every Sikh American who grows up in the U.S. asks their families this question and as two Sikh Americans who maintain our faith, we were no different when we were little. This week, as Americans join in vigils for the six murdered Sikhs in another violent act of hate, many are now asking us this same question. "Our ancestors were beheaded so that we could practice our faith without fear," our grandparents told