Millennials Tag

By Faith Source Originally published on FaithStreet.com. “What is the call for people of faith when they are faced with the aftermath of a riot they may have helped create due to neglect or ignorance wrapped in arrogance? What do all riots all have in common? “They are the phonetic and kinetic sounds and rhythms of the unheard.” – Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III, Trinity Church, Chicago “I arrived outside the Supreme Court around 8:30. Crystal clear day. It was to be a landmark day. SCOTUS would hear arguments that could make gay marriage

It was an incredible experience to watch the first-ever Sikh float at the Rose Parade. It celebrated the story of Sikhs in America, starting with pioneers like my grandfather who settled in California 101 years ago. The float features a replica of the first gurdwara in America - one that he helped build - and a tractor like the one he used to farm. Watching the Rose Parade next to my parents and Sharat, baby Kavi sleeping on my chest, we all teared up when we saw the Sikh float on the screen. My dad started

Check out the new PBS documentary Makers: Women in Business. I make a brief appearance on the question of “leaning in” at minute 43:33-44:55. Though only for a few seconds, I am glad the film documents some of the complexities of the debate surrounding women's leadership and Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In. You can read my full critique published in an essay for MSNBC “Lean in? For Millennials, the question is what are we leaning toward.” Or watch my appearance on the Melissa Harris-Perry show here.

By Annabelle Estera, Asian Pacific American Network, Ohio State University One of the best parts of my job is the ability to bring in engaging, thought-provoking, and inspiring speakers. On November 14th, The Ohio State University welcomed filmmaker, civil rights advocate, and interfaith leader, Valarie Kaur to campus. There was a full day of activities planned, including a lunch, workshop, and dinner with staff and students, culminating with an evening screening of her 2006 documentary “Divided We Fall: Americans in the Aftermath,” which tells the story of her travels around the country documenting

As we reflect on 2013, I would like to share a video of my Baccalaureate address to Stanford University's Class of 2013. I had the honor of becoming the youngest person to deliver the address, and the first from the Sikh tradition. But I offer the call to "enter the whirlwind" for people of all faiths, and all ages. Read the prepared text of my speech below: President Hennessy, Dean McLennan, professors and staff, family and friends, and the Class of 2013, it is a profound gift for me

I was honored to receive a 2013 Person of the Year award from India Abroad. But I must share this award with a rising generation of Sikh and South Asian Americans devoted to justice work -- the stellar staff at the Sikh Coalition, Groundswell, SALDEF, SAALT, and many more. I am proud to be part of a new generation of Americans rising to join a larger movement for human dignity and civil rights. Here is my acceptance speech, a reflection and call to action for the future

Published by Stanford News. President Hennessy, Dean McLennan, professors and staff, family and friends, and the Class of 2013, it is a profound gift for me to return to Stanford to address you. Ten years ago, when I stood in this spot to deliver the student address, I believed what they always tell us on graduation day – that your Stanford education empowers to change the world, that we are the ones we have been waiting for. But what they don't tell us in college is just how dangerous

By Kathleen J. Sullivan Published by Stanford News. When facing the dangers of a courageous life, have faith, alumna Valarie Kaur told the graduates at Baccalaureate, a multi-faith celebration of thanksgiving and inspiration. "Faith in God or faith in goodness, faith that love can conquer death and darkness and despair, faith in yourself, faith in each other." Speaking to the Class of 2013, alumna Valarie Kaur said graduates don't need to be superhuman, super-smart, super fuzzy or super techie to stand up for what they believe in, but need only to

Published by Vogue India. Sikh-American activist and film-maker Valarie Kaur is moving America with her passionate fight for a misunderstood community. By Aarti Virani WHO'S THAT GIRL? Over the weeks that followed the gut-wrenching massacre at a gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin last August–a tragedy that left seven (including the gunman) dead–a brave, young voice filled American airwaves. Even as she spoke for the rights of Sikh-Americans on a dizzying array of media platforms, Valarie Kaur propelled members of her grieving community to organize vigils, write op-eds and join forces