Interfaith Tag

The way that America commemorates the 15 year anniversary of 9/11 will shape our nation's future. Will we honor the dead by recommitting our nation to love? Or will we allow 9/11 to be used to incite hate and violence this election season? As a Sikh mother, the question is a matter of life or death. Because on every 9/11 anniversary, we see an astounding rise in hate against Muslim and Sikh Americans - profiling, bullying, beatings, and killings. That's why, for the first time ever, we are releasing our

In response to the alarming escalation of hate in American life and politics, Valarie Kaur is developing a new project on the theme of "revolutionary love." The project aims to turn bystanders into agents of change this election year and beyond. Currently in production at Seva Productions: a film, book, tour, and app. We are seeking Fellows at Seva Productions -- talented and passionate team members who will work remotely on these projects on a part-time basis. Fellowships are currently unpaid but ideal for professionals, graduate students

I was honored to deliver the address to the graduating class at Chapman University's recent Baccalaureate service. After the service, Gail Sterns, the Dean of Wallace All Faiths Chapel at the University, wrote this wonderful article: If I had been a Christian, I would be a preacher, she said to me. You are - you have found your way! I replied. Valarie Kaur is easily one of the best speakers I have ever heard, and I am a preacher. With great care, Valarie called and emailed students the week prior to her address

Read the original post, from the Holy Innocents' Episcopal School, here. Seniors in the Program for Global Citizenship presented their innovative Capstone Projects Tuesday night, Elizabeth Kendrick ’16 spoke of her Global experience, and Scholar-in-Residence Valarie Kaur capped off two days on campus with an inspirational Global Citizenship Lecture in the Fine Arts Building. Kaur, a multitalented worker for social justice, is an author, MSNBC commentator, civil rights lawyer, award-winning filmmaker, and young mother, but she does not let her roles define her. And in her talk, “The Hot Winds of the World Cannot Touch You,” she encouraged students pursuing the path of global service to

I was honored to receive the Peter J. Gomes STB '68 Memorial Award this week from my alma mater, Harvard Divinity School. Here is the wonderful article that Harvard posted: When Valarie Kaur, MTS '07, visited the Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, after a white supremacist shot six people there in August of 2012, she found none of the recriminations and finger-pointing that characterized the politics of gun violence in the United States. Instead, she joined the community in responding to the hate crime with love, solidarity, and

Here is my address on "revolutionary love" at the Parliament of the World's Religions. It is directed to a particular audience, but I am thinking of centering my book on its core message. If you watch, tell me: what most speaks to you? What does revolutionary love look like in your life? It would be so helpful to hear! In my own life, I have seen this kind of revolutionary love change the world around us and within us. It is the love of Guru Nanak founder of

URGENT: This weekend, hateful protests are planned at Muslim community centers & mosques in 20 cities in America in a coordinated effort called "Global Rally for Humanity." If you're a Sikh or Muslim American, you've likely received an email urging us to be cautious and vigilant against the threat of hate violence. Simply, it's a frightening moment. I don't want to see bloodshed this weekend. I choose to believe that our public solidarity and love can overwhelm and prevent hate. What can you do? Stand with us.

My reflection on the Pope's historic U.S. visit alongside faith leaders I love and respect: A Pope for People of All Faiths by FaithSource at Auburn Seminary Originally published on OnFaith.  A single image from Pope Francis’ visit to America is seared in my mind. At an interfaith service at the 9/11 Memorial, the pope paused on stage when he met Gunisha Kaur — a fellow Sikh woman who has fought tirelessly for human rights and is now carrying her first child. The pope lowered his head, lifted his palms, and offered a

A brutal hate crime on the eve of the 9/11 anniversary has once again shaken the Sikh community. Last week, Inderjit Singh Mukker, a Sikh father was beaten in Chicago as a man called him “terrorist” and “bin Laden.” This happened in the suburb of Darien where my husband grew up. Our first reaction was sadness and overwhelming fatigue. Tomorrow marks the 14-year anniversary of the first post-9/11 hate crime murder of Balbir Singh Sodhi, whose story we tell in our film Divided We Fall. Now as new

Dear Friends: One year ago, when Mike Brown was killed in the midst of tears and grief, we prayed with our hands up as tempers flared and fires burned. When we saw Eric Garner die on camera, it took our breath away. When Sandy Bland died in custody, we saw the lethal consequences of racism behind bars. And when fifteen people died in houses of worship—six in Oak Creek and nine in Charleston, we were stunned that hate could drive white supremacists to spill blood even in sacred