guns Tag

The way that America commemorates the 15 year anniversary of 9/11 will shape our nation's future. Will we honor the dead by recommitting our nation to love? Or will we allow 9/11 to be used to incite hate and violence this election season? As a Sikh mother, the question is a matter of life or death. Because on every 9/11 anniversary, we see an astounding rise in hate against Muslim and Sikh Americans - profiling, bullying, beatings, and killings. That's why, for the first time ever, we are releasing our

Dear Friends: One year ago, when Mike Brown was killed in the midst of tears and grief, we prayed with our hands up as tempers flared and fires burned. When we saw Eric Garner die on camera, it took our breath away. When Sandy Bland died in custody, we saw the lethal consequences of racism behind bars. And when fifteen people died in houses of worship—six in Oak Creek and nine in Charleston, we were stunned that hate could drive white supremacists to spill blood even in sacred

Click here to add your prayer or message of solidarity for the families of Charleston in the wake of the AME shooting. Within hours, Groundswell, Auburn Seminary’s online platform, collected and continues to deliver some 8,000 prayers from people of all faiths and beliefs in response to the horrific murders at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. Some of America’s top faith leaders shared their prayers, heartbreak, and humanity and we offer them here: “There were gun shots in a place of prayer and peace. Cries of terror filled the

The families of three Muslim college students killed last week in Chapel Hill, North Carolina received more than 3,000 messages and prayers of love and support from people across America. The prayers were collected by Groundswell Movement at Auburn Seminary and delivered to the local mosque in Raleigh, NC by Rabbi Eric Solomon of Beth Meyer Synagogue. "Groundswell collected thousands of notes from caring souls throughout the world who declared their willingness to stand in grieving solidarity with these families," Rabbi Solomon told the Barakat and Abu-Salha families. "May the souls

The shocking news out of Chapel Hill tears at my heart – 3 young Muslim students murdered in their home by an extremist with a gun. Many of our friends in the Muslim community are feeling alone, and wondering why this tragedy isn't getting the attention it deserves. In the midst of so much pain and suffering, let us stand with our Muslim American brothers and sisters. Please join me in offering a prayer or message in solidarity. Click here to offer your solidarity, love, or prayer. We'll share your prayers with

During the "Weekend of Resistance" in Ferguson, Missouri, I appeared on "The Melissa Harris-Perry Show" to discuss  why the Weekend and #FergusonOctober calls upon us to confront not just police accountability but race in America. You can watch our panel's segment here: http://www.msnbc.com/melissa-harris-perry/watch/anti-police-violence-movement-draws-youth-340967491740

Here's my interview with State of Belief discussing the one-year anniversary of Oak Creek. In the past twelve months, we have seen the Sikh community rebuild and unite in optimism and love to combat hate violence and domestic terrorism. Watch the video to learn more. Part I: Part II:

By Jessica Testa Published on BuzzFeed. Wade Michael Page didn’t speak to his victims before killing them. One year ago Monday, he “just began shooting.” On Aug. 5, 2012, Page walked into the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin with a 9-millimeter semiautomatic handgun. The 40-year-old Army veteran and skinhead musician killed six worshippers and wounded three others before an Oak Creek police officer shot him down. It was an act of hate — “domestic terrorism” — carried out on a group of people gathered to pray. As filmmaker and civil-rights advocate Valarie Kaur told BuzzFeed

Published on the Melissa Harris-Perry Blog, MSNBC. One year after a gunman murdered six people and wounded many more at a Sikh house of worship in Oak Creek, WI, Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the Justice Department will begin tracking hate crimes against Sikh Americans and six other groups for the first time in U.S. history. Sikh-Americans, along with Hindus, Arabs, Buddhists, Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Orthodox Christians who are victims of hate crimes will finally be counted on the Hate Crime Incident Report form. Adding specific categories

Published on Washington Post. Today marks the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where a lone gunman killed six people in a Sikh house of worship. It was the largest hate-based act of violence on a faith community since the 1963 church bombings of the civil rights era. “I miss my mother every day,” said Harpreet Saini, who lost his mother in the shooting at age 18. “But I want to make her proud, so I’m honoring her memory through seva [service].” Harpreet Saini and the other young people of