gun violence Tag

The way that America commemorates the 15 year anniversary of 9/11 will shape our nation's future. Will we honor the dead by recommitting our nation to love? Or will we allow 9/11 to be used to incite hate and violence this election season? As a Sikh mother, the question is a matter of life or death. Because on every 9/11 anniversary, we see an astounding rise in hate against Muslim and Sikh Americans - profiling, bullying, beatings, and killings. That's why, for the first time ever, we are releasing our

I'm in Oak Creek today to commemorate the four-year anniversary of a mass shooting on Sikh Americans. On August 5, 2012, a white supremacist opened fire in a Sikh gurdwara in this small town in Wisconsin, spilling blood in a place of prayer and peace. He killed six people and wounded many more. The tragedy too quickly fell out of national memory. But that's not why I keep coming back. As a Sikh, all my life I have been taught “chardi kala” – the spirit of optimism and revolutionary

A call to action: If you grieve the police officers killed in Dallas and the black people shot by police, if you believe we can demand police accountability and join hands with police officers who want to end racism and violence, if you hunger to channel anger and grief into #revolutionarylove, then please read and sign this letter. We are going to deliver this letter to police departments and Black Lives Matter chapters across the country. I wrote this letter with prophetic faith leaders Jacqui Lewis Brian D. McLaren Gene Robinson Sister Simone Campbell and Michael-Ray Mathews. In

Dear Friends: One year ago, when Mike Brown was killed in the midst of tears and grief, we prayed with our hands up as tempers flared and fires burned. When we saw Eric Garner die on camera, it took our breath away. When Sandy Bland died in custody, we saw the lethal consequences of racism behind bars. And when fifteen people died in houses of worship—six in Oak Creek and nine in Charleston, we were stunned that hate could drive white supremacists to spill blood even in sacred

This article was originally published in The Washington Post. Gunshots in a sanctuary of peace. Cries of terror where people sing God’s name. Blood in the prayer hall. A community shaken by hate but coming together to sing, pray and forgive even before they’ve laid the dead to rest. This is what happened three years ago in Oak Creek, Wis., when a white supremacist opened fire in a Sikh house of worship on a Sunday morning and killed six people. It was one of the deadliest attacks on a faith community

Click here to add your prayer or message of solidarity for the families of Charleston in the wake of the AME shooting. Within hours, Groundswell, Auburn Seminary’s online platform, collected and continues to deliver some 8,000 prayers from people of all faiths and beliefs in response to the horrific murders at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. Some of America’s top faith leaders shared their prayers, heartbreak, and humanity and we offer them here: “There were gun shots in a place of prayer and peace. Cries of terror filled the

The families of three Muslim college students killed last week in Chapel Hill, North Carolina received more than 3,000 messages and prayers of love and support from people across America. The prayers were collected by Groundswell Movement at Auburn Seminary and delivered to the local mosque in Raleigh, NC by Rabbi Eric Solomon of Beth Meyer Synagogue. "Groundswell collected thousands of notes from caring souls throughout the world who declared their willingness to stand in grieving solidarity with these families," Rabbi Solomon told the Barakat and Abu-Salha families. "May the souls

Published on Melissa Harris-Perry Blog, MSNBC. Last Saturday night, a young man dropped his wife and one-year old at home and went for a walk in Harlem. Soon thereafter, he heard “Get Osama!” Twenty men on bicycles chased him down, pulled his beard, and punched him to the ground. The blows would not stop as his assailants called him a “terrorist.” When bystanders came to his aid, he was rushed to the hospital, his face bloody and bruised, and his jaw fractured. The victim, Dr. Prabhjot Singh, is a young professor

Published on CNN. The other night was one of the most sacred and extraordinary events of my life as an advocate. A gathering of people from all around our country with one thing in common: a desire to stop the gun violence that plagues their lives and continues to plague our nation. Marking the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, young Sikhs of Oak Creek organized a candlelight vigil against gun violence at the same gurdwara where six people were murdered. One would anticipate the one-year

By Sean Lewis Published on WGN Chicago. In the rain, the community of Oak Creek Wisconsin came together, remembering the tragedy here one year ago. To this day, no one knows why gunman, white supremacist and army veteran wade Michael Page walked into the Sikh Temple on a Sunday morning and began to shoot.  He killed six people and injured many others before he shot and killed himself. “This is not just a Sikh tragedy, this is an American tragedy,” Filmmaker Valarie Kaur has spent the last year talking with the victims