FCC Tag

This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post. Today, after more than a year of national debate, the Open Internet Order goes into effect. The Order keeps the Internet an open and democratic space free from undue corporate control. Business leaders, start-up innovators, and economists widely praise the Order as win for the economic growth. But protecting the open Internet is not just sound policy -- it's a moral imperative. Today, I join twelve of America's top faith and moral leaders - Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh, and Humanist - to celebrate

This piece original appeared in On Faith. Today, the Open Internet Order becomes effective. Adopted after a year of national debate, the order codifies “net neutrality” — the principle that keeps the Internet an open and democratic space. Specifically, it bans carriers like Comcast and Verizon from blocking and slowing down websites at will, or charging sites extra fees to reach people faster. Why are Americans of all faiths and beliefs celebrating? If carriers created “fast lanes” online, most faith and non-profit groups could not afford to be in them.

Every issue we care about - immigration, policing, gun violence, climate change, hate crimes, you name it - requires us to protect the Internet as a place where we can organize, innovate, and connect. If you have been following my last few posts, you know that right now, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is considering a proposal that would end the Internet as we know it. It will create fast lanes for those who pay—and slow lanes for the rest of us. President Obama just announced a new plan to protect a

Published on CNN. Editor's note: Barbara van Schewick, author of "Internet Architecture and Innovation," is a professor at Stanford Law School and director of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. Follow her on Twitter: @vanschewick.  Valarie Kaur is Media & Strategy Fellow at the Center and contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. The results of the midterm election confirm Americans' widespread discontent with Washington gridlock on a range of issues. In the last few months, millions of people contacted the White House, Congress

Published on CNN. Editor’s note: Barbara van Schewick is an expert on net neutrality, a professor at Stanford Law School and director of the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. She is the author of “Internet Architecture and Innovation.” Follow her on Twitter at @vanschewick. Valarie Kaur, a media and strategy fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society, contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. On Wednesday, millions of Americans visiting their favorite websites will