TV/Radio

I will be giving a Ted Talk this fall - the announcement just went up! I am putting together stories + studies in ethics, law and even science to make the case for why Revolutionary Love is the call of our times. Especially in the face of white supremacist violence. Deep breath. If you can, please join my parents, baby Kavi, and me in New Orleans this November! Click on these links for information on tickets and on the inspiring line up.   Photo taken from tedwomen2017.ted.com

On September 15, at sunset in Arizona, a crowd gathered at the corner of a Chevron gas station called the Mesa Star. Like every year since 2002, Rana Sodhi hosted a memorial here for his brother, Balbir Singh Sodhi. Balbir was shot while planting flowers in front of his store on September 15, 2001 — four days after the 9/11 attacks. On this night every year, the station is transformed into sacred space, where we listen to prayers, hold candles and place red roses on the cool marble where Balbir

One of the first people killed in a hate crime after 9/11 was a family friend, Balbir Singh Sodhi. He was 52, a Sikh father who wore a turban and beard as part of his faith. He was the first of dozens of Sikhs and Muslims in America killed in the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attack. But his murder barely made the evening news. I was 20 years old, afraid for both my country and community. The Sikh faith calls us to social action, even in times of

Friends ask me why I've taken on Internet freedom as part of my advocacy work. Click below to hear my 12-minute interview on "State of Belief" radio with Rev. Welton Gaddy explaining why: You can also read the transcript: Interfaith Alliance State of Belief Radio March 14, 2015 TRANSCRIPT: REV. DR. C. WELTON GADDY, HOST: This past week, I noticed a strident column in the conservativeWashington Timesdecrying the Federal Communication Commission’s new rules on Net Neutrality asan existential threat to religious freedom. Huh? Joining me now to shed some light on this issue is

During the "Weekend of Resistance" in Ferguson, Missouri, I appeared on "The Melissa Harris-Perry Show" to discuss  why the Weekend and #FergusonOctober calls upon us to confront not just police accountability but race in America. You can watch our panel's segment here: http://www.msnbc.com/melissa-harris-perry/watch/anti-police-violence-movement-draws-youth-340967491740

For the Sikh festival of Vaisakhi, I was so honored to speak at the first ever Sikh event at the Pentagon. Enjoy this video of my remarks and the rest of the event, or read a transcript  here. The Sikh Coalition wrote about the celebration and posted pictures of it here: "Last Friday, for the first time in American history, the Office of the Pentagon Chaplain commemorated Vaisakhi, one of the most religiously significant days in the Sikh tradition

Here is my interview reflecting on the one-year anniversary of the Oak Creek tragedy on PBS's Religion and Ethics Newsweekly. In the last year, I've witnessed the Sikh spirit of Chardi Kala, everlasting hope and optimism, even in suffering. This is the untold story of tragedy. Want to honor Oak Creek? Watch the Film. Join the Movement: http://www.groundswell-movement.org/the-one-year-anniversary-of-oak-creek  

Watch this outstanding PBS news report about the Sikh community's response to the mass shooting in Oak Creek, WI one year later. I had an opportunity to present my perspective on advocating for the Sikh community. Watch the full interview to learn more about the Sikh spirit of chardhi kala, everlasting optimism and ever-rising high spirits, even in the face of tragedy.  

Here's my take on Angelina Jolie's story to pursue preventive care for breast cancer. On MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry Show, I talk about how women's health movements can use stories like Jolie's to break down economic and cultural barriers to care facing lower-income women and women of color, not just for breast cancer but for other less visible diseases such as myeloma and endometriosis.