Open Internet

If you recognize my name, it's because we're connected in a magical way. Four years ago, I founded Groundswell because I had a dream – to connect people of faith to build a moral movement for justice. Today, you and me and over 100,000 others have taken faithful action together! We built this movement with a lot of heart – and with the help of the Internet. But right now the Internet is under attack, and I'm in the fight to save it. There's a big vote this Thursday and if

Hi everyone, Today, our minds and hearts are in Ferguson. In the face of sadness and despair, we still find hope in this: people of all colors and faiths from all corners of the country are calling for justice for Michael Brown - on the ground and online. Their courage reaffirms our commitment to protect the tool that makes this work possible -- a free and open Internet. Will you join us? Tell your story about how you use the Internet in your work for social justice. It's really simple.

Every issue we care about - immigration, policing, gun violence, climate change, hate crimes, you name it - requires us to protect the Internet as a place where we can organize, innovate, and connect. If you have been following my last few posts, you know that right now, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is considering a proposal that would end the Internet as we know it. It will create fast lanes for those who pay—and slow lanes for the rest of us. President Obama just announced a new plan to protect a

Published on CNN. Editor's note: Barbara van Schewick, author of "Internet Architecture and Innovation," is a professor at Stanford Law School and director of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. Follow her on Twitter: @vanschewick.  Valarie Kaur is Media & Strategy Fellow at the Center and contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. The results of the midterm election confirm Americans' widespread discontent with Washington gridlock on a range of issues. In the last few months, millions of people contacted the White House, Congress

Published on CNN. Editor’s note: Barbara van Schewick is an expert on net neutrality, a professor at Stanford Law School and director of the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. She is the author of “Internet Architecture and Innovation.” Follow her on Twitter at @vanschewick. Valarie Kaur, a media and strategy fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society, contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. On Wednesday, millions of Americans visiting their favorite websites will