Guns

On September 15, at sunset in Arizona, a crowd gathered at the corner of a Chevron gas station called the Mesa Star. Like every year since 2002, Rana Sodhi hosted a memorial here for his brother, Balbir Singh Sodhi. Balbir was shot while planting flowers in front of his store on September 15, 2001 — four days after the 9/11 attacks. On this night every year, the station is transformed into sacred space, where we listen to prayers, hold candles and place red roses on the cool marble where Balbir

I'm in Oak Creek today to commemorate the four-year anniversary of a mass shooting on Sikh Americans. On August 5, 2012, a white supremacist opened fire in a Sikh gurdwara in this small town in Wisconsin, spilling blood in a place of prayer and peace. He killed six people and wounded many more. The tragedy too quickly fell out of national memory. But that's not why I keep coming back. As a Sikh, all my life I have been taught “chardi kala” – the spirit of optimism and revolutionary

A call to action: If you grieve the police officers killed in Dallas and the black people shot by police, if you believe we can demand police accountability and join hands with police officers who want to end racism and violence, if you hunger to channel anger and grief into #revolutionarylove, then please read and sign this letter. We are going to deliver this letter to police departments and Black Lives Matter chapters across the country. I wrote this letter with prophetic faith leaders Jacqui Lewis Brian D. McLaren Gene Robinson Sister Simone Campbell and Michael-Ray Mathews. In

I was honored to receive the Peter J. Gomes STB '68 Memorial Award this week from my alma mater, Harvard Divinity School. Here is the wonderful article that Harvard posted: When Valarie Kaur, MTS '07, visited the Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, after a white supremacist shot six people there in August of 2012, she found none of the recriminations and finger-pointing that characterized the politics of gun violence in the United States. Instead, she joined the community in responding to the hate crime with love, solidarity, and

This post originally appeared on Upworthy.  by Isabel Evans Donald Trump called for an end to all Muslim immigration into the United States and it was pretty scary. That’s old news by now. But the cool part you might not have heard about? As a response, a group of faith leaders from lots of different religions united in support of Muslims. On Dec. 9, 2015, those faith leaders published an open letter to the American Muslim community pledging solidarity, love, and support to Muslims "with our voices, our actions, and our bodies." The organizers of the

This article was originally posted on The Huffington Post. by Antonia Blumberg Muslim Americans have found themselves at the center of ugly debate in the political arena as of late. At a time when religious literacy and dialogue could be our saving grace against the divisive rhetoric of terrorists, some have chosen fear and hatred, instead.But in the wake of Donald Trump's call for a "complete shutdown" of Muslims entering the U.S., a group of religious leaders released a statement of solidaritywith the Muslim community in the United States on Dec. 9. "In place of such dangerous rhetoric," the statement

Here is my address on "revolutionary love" at the Parliament of the World's Religions. It is directed to a particular audience, but I am thinking of centering my book on its core message. If you watch, tell me: what most speaks to you? What does revolutionary love look like in your life? It would be so helpful to hear! In my own life, I have seen this kind of revolutionary love change the world around us and within us. It is the love of Guru Nanak founder of

Dear Friends: One year ago, when Mike Brown was killed in the midst of tears and grief, we prayed with our hands up as tempers flared and fires burned. When we saw Eric Garner die on camera, it took our breath away. When Sandy Bland died in custody, we saw the lethal consequences of racism behind bars. And when fifteen people died in houses of worship—six in Oak Creek and nine in Charleston, we were stunned that hate could drive white supremacists to spill blood even in sacred

This article was originally published in The Washington Post. Gunshots in a sanctuary of peace. Cries of terror where people sing God’s name. Blood in the prayer hall. A community shaken by hate but coming together to sing, pray and forgive even before they’ve laid the dead to rest. This is what happened three years ago in Oak Creek, Wis., when a white supremacist opened fire in a Sikh house of worship on a Sunday morning and killed six people. It was one of the deadliest attacks on a faith community

Click here to add your prayer or message of solidarity for the families of Charleston in the wake of the AME shooting. Within hours, Groundswell, Auburn Seminary’s online platform, collected and continues to deliver some 8,000 prayers from people of all faiths and beliefs in response to the horrific murders at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. Some of America’s top faith leaders shared their prayers, heartbreak, and humanity and we offer them here: “There were gun shots in a place of prayer and peace. Cries of terror filled the