September 2016

On September 15, at sunset in Arizona, a crowd gathered at the corner of a Chevron gas station called the Mesa Star. Like every year since 2002, Rana Sodhi hosted a memorial here for his brother, Balbir Singh Sodhi. Balbir was shot while planting flowers in front of his store on September 15, 2001 — four days after the 9/11 attacks. On this night every year, the station is transformed into sacred space, where we listen to prayers, hold candles and place red roses on the cool marble where Balbir

This election season, campuses and communities across the country will host 100 FILM SCREENINGS and DIALOGUES on Revolutionary Love. They will screen our film Divided We Fall, the first documentary film to chronicle the struggles of Sikh and Muslim Americans in the aftermath of 9/11 and their resilience in the aftermath of violence. This is the first call to action of the Revolutionary Love Project, my new initiative at University of Southern California ORL. Click on any public event below to join a dialogue near you. Or sign up

Live From #GroundZero. Watch here. I was with Kerri Kelly on 9/11 to honor her step-father Lt Joe Leavey, a fireman who rushed up flights of stairs to save people and was killed 15 years ago today. She wants an end to hate & bigotry in Joe's name. Together we are reclaiming 9/11 in the name of #revolutionarylove. On 9/15 she joined me in Phoenix to honor my family friend and uncle Balbir Singh Sodhi, Sikh American and the first of dozens killed in hate crimes in the aftermath of

One of the first people killed in a hate crime after 9/11 was a family friend, Balbir Singh Sodhi. He was 52, a Sikh father who wore a turban and beard as part of his faith. He was the first of dozens of Sikhs and Muslims in America killed in the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attack. But his murder barely made the evening news. I was 20 years old, afraid for both my country and community. The Sikh faith calls us to social action, even in times of

The way that America commemorates the 15 year anniversary of 9/11 will shape our nation's future. Will we honor the dead by recommitting our nation to love? Or will we allow 9/11 to be used to incite hate and violence this election season? As a Sikh mother, the question is a matter of life or death. Because on every 9/11 anniversary, we see an astounding rise in hate against Muslim and Sikh Americans - profiling, bullying, beatings, and killings. That's why, for the first time ever, we are releasing our